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How to soften impact of newly added garden cabin

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  • Ivy2Ivy2 Posts: 73
    That's interesting @Fire (username checks out:). Your solution looks more aesthetically pleasing than my initial plans.

    I was looking at just getting a halogen or oil heater to put under my desk and plug in but haven't committed to anything yet.

    Also looking at heated seat pads and heated body warmers like this:


    Neighbour gave me a fan heater but they are expensive to run and tend to heat the room not the body.

    The cabin is twin skin and insulated but it's going to get cold - especially in the mornings.





  • NollieNollie Posts: 7,512
    I don’t think you need anything in your triangular paved space behind the cabin as your neighbour’s trees are providing good screening and softening there already.

    I would, as suggested, extend the bed on the left of your cabin and plant a tree to (in time) hide the visible dormer window/roofline then plant some wispy grasses and maybe see-though perennials in front. Maybe extending the extended bed around the front lefthand corner of the cabin a bit to soften and blend the structure in.

    My choice of tree would be a coral bark acer that can take happily morning sun and is not as deathly slow growing as the palmatum types. Or a liquidambar would do the trick. Both offer lovely foliage and autumn colour.

    You could also remove a triangle of grass or place a large pot in the right hand corner to plant a fragrant shrub. The cabin itself may look a little stark at the moment but will naturally weather in time.
    Mountainous Northern Catalunya, Spain. Hot summers, cold winters.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,630
    edited October 2022
    @Ivy2 If you are in a cold windy part of Derbyshire I would take advice from the nursery you purchase your tree from as to whether your growing conditions are suitable. What type of soil you have needs to be considered. I would use a specialist tree grower rather than the local GC they be able to give good advice.
    Our local Garden Club have use Greenmile Trees at Retford Notts.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • LeadFarmerLeadFarmer Posts: 1,482
    They sound a good idea, thanks.
  • Ivy2Ivy2 Posts: 73
    edited January 2023
    Revisiting this now I need to extend this border up to the garden cabin. Wondering about the shape of the border extension. Curved looks better than straight I believe. Which general shape would you take from the 3 lines below in pic?

    Also, do to turn that bit of lawn into border, can I simply get my spade and sink it 10 cms or so into the soil and then lower the handle closer to the ground and kind of scrape the turf up. Would that work? Hoping the grass doesn't regrow. The soil will be pretty wet now so hoping that would make it easier.

    Finally I think for the tree I will go for a multi stem Amelanchiar. One of these: https://www.grasslands.co.uk/amelanchier-lamarkii-multi-stem-root-ball-150-175cm.html

    I will incorporate some of the plants and grasses mentioned upthread too.


  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,294
    Looking again at your first photo I think I'd consider making a semi-circular border around the front of your cabin with the path running through the middle.
    Using grasses, perennials and a few annuals it'd look great-



    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,836
    I'd certainly get rid of the wiggly lines of the existing border. That will give a much better appearance to the border. 
    If you go for @Pete.8 suggestion, then do a sweeping curve from the existing border right across. 
    This type of thing


    You can make it deeper or shallower depending on preference, and there would then be room for the tree etc.
    Grass edging is always easier to cut when wet, but mark out the line you want first, and take a look from various positions before you start  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,294
    That's a lot more stylish than my suggestion @Fairygirl :)
    It would make it a real feature and soften the view


    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,836
    I have great difficulty using that edit feature @Pete.8 . I'm surprised I managed to get it relatively even  :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Ivy2Ivy2 Posts: 73
    Thanks! It's easy to do isn't it. Do you think I need a half moon cutter things or just a flat spade would be ok?
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