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Subsidence

Due to the pleasures of this years dry spell I have some heavy subsidence appearing in some of the brick work in the garden such as the pond and surrounding path. We’re sat on a steep hill with heavy clay. 

Has anyone had any experience of trying to fix these issues if so any tips/help would very much be appreciated! 
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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,876
    I'd engage the services of a structural engineer
    Devon.
  • No real idea but if we get alot of rain will it go back?
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 194
    I’m hoping for an improvement but think long term it’s likely to be an issue if continue with these dry spells. Sadly removal of the pond may be the answer 
  • Heavy clay soil can suffer with subsidence at any time, however in drought it can be really bad and worse still if you have trees near by (they draw loads of water out of the ground) Common problem I have now with building projects where ground conditions at looked at much more carefully than previously as the issue is better understood.
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 194
    Heavy clay soil can suffer with subsidence at any time, however in drought it can be really bad and worse still if you have trees near by (they draw loads of water out of the ground) Common problem I have now with building projects where ground conditions at looked at much more carefully than previously as the issue is better understood.
    Yep here’s where we double down, back into woodland so large tree next to the offending issue. 

    Any thoughts on solutions? Reached out to a structural engineer 
  • Wait for the engineer to give advice. I have a site local to me with houses built on piles but nothing else is, the whole site has sunk between 5&11 inch it's causing all sorts of problems. 
  • I think deeper foundations are the answer.
  • Deeper foundations won't the answer if the ground below is still clay. Foundations near mature trees have to be designed by a structural engineer these days as they cause significant heave and slumping. 

    As I say wait for a structural report. If they are garden walls for decoration only then it's likely cheaper to knock them down and start again. I'm a builder and can say there's no way of saying do this or that without lots of information and a site visit 
  • McRazzMcRazz Posts: 419
    Maybe try to keep more moisture in the soil by increasing vegetative cover and mulching?

    Its been a bad year for this. My house is cracked everywhere downstairs from the drying ground, and cracked everywhere upstairs from the heat and low humidity drying out the timbers. Climate change in action. 
  • Can you take a photo? I'm guessing any foundations for the brickwork and path will be very shallow?
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