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Woodland planting advice

Ive recently built some wooden planters along a wall in my yard. Ive gone for a woodland theme, using mainly ferns, as 2/3 of the wall is in shade. I dont have much plant knowledge at the moment and find that my local garden centres don't either.
Could I have a little advice on a gap I have (see picture). I previously had an Asplenium in the red circle (ignore the pots), but it was getting too much sun, so I moved it. Also in mid summer when the sun reached up the yard the furthest the ferns beside the red circle were getting scorched.
So is there something that could go in the red and blue circles that could maybe shade the scorched prone ferns and maybe add a little height too. Oh and I dont like flowers.

Thanks in adavance of any advice
Jon


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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 86,989
    edited September 2022
    What about some more of the smaller hostas .(I think I can see one there already, but there's lots of various shades and markings) they can cope with sun as long as they've got damp feet ... @Hostafan1 can suggest some varieties ... 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • The shade loving but sun tolerant grass Hakonechloa macra might suit.  The variegated variety looks a bit like the three plants you have in the top right planter.  I grow H. aureola in both shade and sun.  In shade it is lime green, in sun more yellow.  It has a clumping habit and grows up to 45cm. 
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


  • Hmm. Not sure, they would have to be sun lovers and large leafed. It could be a possiblility for the upper planter.
  • The shade loving but sun tolerant grass Hakonechloa macra might suit.  The variegated variety looks a bit like the three plants you have in the top right planter.  I grow H. aureola in both shade and sun.  In shade it is lime green, in sun more yellow.  It has a clumping habit and grows up to 45cm. 

    Thanks. Ive just had a look at that. I dont think its what I want for this side of the yard, but I like it for the other, where I have a large Black Bamboo.
  • Yes, it will go well with your bamboo.  Just keep them well watered and top up or refresh the compost at the start of each growing season if you are growing them in containers.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,306
    edited September 2022
    @monkeyspram For the red circle Tiarellas or Heucheras, you could always dead head the flowers. Various colours, beware vine weevil love them in pots so you will need to be vigilant.
    Note neither are fully evergreen with me in South Notts.

    Your silver grass is perfect for a sunny space if that is thriving as it appears to be you need something that can tolerate full sun as you suggest, if it is growing in the same space you will also need something that likes it well drained so grit required.

    Most plants with larger leaves prefer a shady spot. Those that can tolerate the sun need lots of water, most become large plants and are not suitable for a pot or trough. 

    I can see you are trying to limit your colour pallet which is the best way, green should dominate with a little colour to stop it looking dull would be my thought. You have ferns to one end grasses to the other I think the bit in the middle needs to link the two together.

    I do like the Hosta with the grass they work well. Another thought might be a Curry plant with the grass again deadhead. Also Libertia peregrinans lovely in winter.

    One plant I could see in there is Asarum europaeum but out of the reach of small children. Needs shade but great with ferns.

    Sorry if this is a bit of a jumble it is how it comes out of my head!
    Looking forward to my new garden with clay soil here in South Notts.

    Gardening is so exciting I wet my plants. 
  • How about Sarcocca? It's evergreen, could take some sun, stands  fairly upright and won't grow huge in a pot. OK, it does have flowers in winter, but they are tiny and not very noticeable apart from the lovely perfume they give.
  • @monkeyspram For the red circle Tiarellas or Heucheras, you could always dead head the flowers. Various colours, beware vine weevil love them in pots so you will need to be vigilant.
    Note neither are fully evergreen with me in South Notts.

    Your silver grass is perfect for a sunny space if that is thriving as it appears to be you need something that can tolerate full sun as you suggest, if it is growing in the same space you will also need something that likes it well drained so grit required.

    Most plants with larger leaves prefer a shady spot. Those that can tolerate the sun need lots of water, most become large plants and are not suitable for a pot or trough. 

    I can see you are trying to limit your colour pallet which is the best way, green should dominate with a little colour to stop it looking dull would be my thought. You have ferns to one end grasses to the other I think the bit in the middle needs to link the two together.

    I do like the Hosta with the grass they work well. Another thought might be a Curry plant with the grass again deadhead. Also Libertia peregrinans lovely in winter.

    One plant I could see in there is Asarum europaeum but out of the reach of small children. Needs shade but great with ferns.

    Sorry if this is a bit of a jumble it is how it comes out of my head!

    No, thats great , thats how my head works too, thanks. For one one of the spaces I might be swaying towards a Large Hosta, Tiarellas or Heucheras
  • @monkeyspram You could look on Plantagogo's web site lots of ideas. Tiarella's need more shade. Also some Heuchera's are more tolerant of sun than others.  There are silivers and dark reds also greens with tones of red. Enjoy looking!
    Looking forward to my new garden with clay soil here in South Notts.

    Gardening is so exciting I wet my plants. 
  • Another plant worth considering is Bergenia.  It is evergreen, has large oval leaves which will provide shade for your fern and it's happy in full sun or shade.  It's often grown in woodland settings, flowers briefly in spring (you may appreciate this after winter!), but you can easily remove the flowers.  There are lots of varieties, one called Overture has a leaf colour change to deep red in winter.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


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