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Ideas for screening a long section of fence

We've just moved to a house with a long garden, and would appreciate any advice on how to further screen the view from the building on the right (picture attached).

The 'exposed' section of fence is about 35m long. We've thought about planting various trees rather than ending up with a long, square leylandi hedge, but are unsure of the practicality.

Thanks.

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Posts

  • Forgot to mention - this is in North London, and the view from the garden to the building on the right is North.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,752
    A row of trees would certainly be nicer, because although hedges are excellent at giving privacy, there are restrictions on their height. Whether that would be a factor- as it doesn't seem to be a private residence, is hard to estimate, but it would need to be a very large height to block that, and it would cast a lot of shade. The maintenance of it would also be considerable.
    However, nothing is going to instantly block that. Trees will take years  to be of any height and have decent canopies, unless you have the finances to buy very established specimens, and more importantly - the skill to get them properly established.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,373
    It might be better to concentrate two or three trees nearer your house to help block that building, perhaps a small copse of 3 silver birches and not worry too much about what you can see when you are further down in the garden.

    You could also think about erecting a trellis right along the length of the fence to give extra height and plant  a mix of individual tall shrubs in front of it.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • Lizzie27 said:
    It might be better to concentrate two or three trees nearer your house to help block that building, perhaps a small copse of 3 silver birches and not worry too much about what you can see when you are further down in the garden.

    You could also think about erecting a trellis right along the length of the fence to give extra height and plant  a mix of individual tall shrubs in front of it.

    Thanks for your suggestions. 

    Fortunately the house is not overlooked, as our other neighbour has a large tree on that side - it's only when we're in the middle / back of the garden. 

    The trellis is a great idea but the fence posts aren't in great shape and it's likely the fence will be replaced at some point (it doesn't belong to us).




  • Fairygirl said:
    A row of trees would certainly be nicer, because although hedges are excellent at giving privacy, there are restrictions on their height. Whether that would be a factor- as it doesn't seem to be a private residence, is hard to estimate, but it would need to be a very large height to block that, and it would cast a lot of shade. The maintenance of it would also be considerable.
    However, nothing is going to instantly block that. Trees will take years  to be of any height and have decent canopies, unless you have the finances to buy very established specimens, and more importantly - the skill to get them properly established.  :)

    Thanks for responding. I didn't know there were restrictions on hedge height. The building on the right contains a number of flats, and the part adjoining our garden is a driveway for their underground car park (another reason we want to block the view!)
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,415
    You could put trellis on tall posts inside the fence line. Similar structure to pleached trees, but probably less expensive than ready-trained trees and you could grow clematis or other not-too-heavy climbers on it, and plant shrubs to hide the fence below. The posts would have to be very well anchored to stop them getting blown over in windy weather.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286
    edited August 2022
    Your new garden looks like quite a project!
    Some fastigiate trees may give the desired effect.
    Such trees grow tall rather than broad so giving more height.
    There are many varieties.
    Some ideas here-
    https://www.google.com/search?q=fastigiate+trees&sxsrf=ALiCzsZ_agciM8rNXPBfiUCHR3mU6WRywg:1660724750575&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbns_muc35AhURgFwKHdHxC6wQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1920&bih=1089&dpr=1

    A row of fastigiate birch would look good

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,681
    edited August 2022
    I think broad growing trees would help actually... if you look at the fence on the original photo, you want something 3-4 times the height, so about 5-7m; and broad-spreading to fill in the gap so the crown is in your sightline toward the building.

    I put the parameters 5-7m, round or spreading crown, into this site
    Loads of options, but Corylus avellana (Hazel), Prunus 'Accolade', Crataegus laevigata, Cotinus coggyria, Malus 'Donald Wyman' could be good ones. I do thik Hazel is useful, it's readily available, quite cheap, and can be coppiced to maintain a bushy multi-stem form if desired.
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286
    I agree that broad trees would be ideal, but they will also encroach on quite a bit of the width of the garden. They will need to be planted a reasonable distance from the fence to start with and in time will spread over the garden.
    If the garden is wide then that's not an issue of course and maybe that's what the OP is looking for.
    They may also take longer to have the desired effect whilst they're spreading outwards.

    The fastigiate trees will grow upwards faster and block the view without encroaching over too much of the garden.

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,831
    Unless your hedge is 3-4 metres or more high, it's never going to screen that block, would take years to reach that height, and would mean a lot of trimming each year. 

    Trees would be better, but I would go for a woodland/orchard effect, where they are dotted around the garden, and you can walk/sit in between them, rather than planting a row of trees up against the fence, as a barrier screen.

    If you plant trees too close to the fence, they will be more difficult to establish, as fences create a rain shadow, and their roots may push the fence out of alignment in future. If the trees overhang your neighbour, they will have the right to cut anything overhanging their property, which you may not like, and nor certain species of tree.

    I recognise the block, we live just along the road from you. If you want any advice about good local nurseries and garden centres, private message me. Welcome to the area! 
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