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Tree Preservation Order

GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 1,957
Friends has a huge Ash tree in their garden. The order was placed over thirty years ago by the previous owners. The tree canopy now covers about a third of the garden. Once an order is placed, does anyone professional check if it safe?
Trees on a National Trust property are checked regularly. Is anyone interested after a preservation order has been placed or is it a case of walk away! This tree really doesn't seem right in a domestic garden. 
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  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 1,921
    As far as I know, no one comes to check whether the tree is "safe" or not.  It's up to the poor householder to employ a Tree surgeon.  If any pruning is needed, then permission has to be sought from the local Council before any work takes place and they can place restrictions on what can or cannot be done.
    I'm in the same situation with my huge Ash tree.  No TPO as such but being in a Conservation Area, permission still has to be sought and granted ( or not ! ) before any work can be carried out.
    It cost me £600 3 years ago to have it trimmed and it will need doing again soon. I like the tree and it is certainly a landmark but wonder when councils may begin to consider the cost paid by one householder for the supposed benefit of the "community".  Land owners are offered grants for conservation work but  no such help for the garden owner.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,059
    It's a problem I've come across over the years.
    I'd suggest speaking with the TPO officer at your local council and explain the situation. Like us, they have an interest in trees and they are generally understanding of problems and very helpful.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,156
    A big ash with a TPO needs a periodic check over by a tree surgeon to ensure it does not have ash die back, although that is fairly obvious if you know what you are looking at.   If the Ash tree does have dieback, then that is sufficient reason to have it removed before it falls.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 1,957
    Thankyou all for your help and comments. If anyone else can offer their thoughts it would be much appreciated . Suze
  • TackTack Central South UKPosts: 983
    edited 31 July
    We have 2 huge Ash (amongst othrs) with TPOs in our garden. A large, seemingly healthy bough broke off without warning one sunny, not windy afternoon 2 years ago. After employing a tree surgeon with the necessary qualifications who diagnosed Ash dieback in both we applied to the council to fell. The person responsible for trees said the disease was nowhere near far enough gone and we should watch and wait. We were allowed to spend £500 on having the many dead branches removed. I hate it when people go under the trees now which is a lot of the time as they cover about a quarter of the garden. We'll have to get the newly dead branches removed again soon.
    Edit. The neighbour is even more worried about the trees than we are, they overhang his building but he can't get the council to give permission to reduce the trees either.
  • TheVanguardTheVanguard Posts: 116
    I’ve had a similar situation with three lime trees in my front garden, our tree surgeon suggested it was about time to pollard them again, but recommended we contacted our local tree officer first.

    He came out and had a good look as well as give us some advice about the tree’s etc he didn’t seem to raise any problems and we’ve submitted our application and are just waiting to hear back.

    I think the approach of getting your tree officer out and just having a chat is probably the best way forward.

    We love the trees but just want to keep them in check and stop them overhanging neighbours so are hoping to pollard them every 7-10 years or so.


  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,630
    edited 31 July
    @Tack, take the matter up with your local MP. They are often surprisingly helpful in having a 'word' with the local Council.

    Or involve your insurers, they may insist on a tree report which you can wave at the Council.
  • KT53KT53 South WestPosts: 6,820
    Lizzie27 said:
    @Tack, take the matter up with your local MP. They are often surprisingly helpful in having a 'word' with the local Council.

    Or involve your insurers, they may insist on a tree report which you can wave at the Council.

    I was about to say something similar, but would be inclined to add that you will ensure that it anybody is injured by the council's refusal to permit action to make the tree safe, that person makes a claim against the council.
  • nick615nick615 SW IrelandPosts: 1,093
    It rather depends whether said 'Friends' would like to see the tree gone, as there are measures that can hasten its demise.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 1,957
    Thank you all.  I will pass your thoughts and comments on. I find it hard to understand that a preservation order can be placed on a tree and that seems to be that. If the effort has been made to place the order in the first place surely it is important to continue to monitor it's care.  
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