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Allium

If I planted my allium bulbs too shallow should I dig them up and replant?

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  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,156
    When did you plant them? If they have flowered and then died down already, it os OK to dig them up. If they were too shallow you might find they have split into lots of small bulbs that may take a couple of years to get back to flowering size.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • I planted them last fall they still  have flowers on top but you can tell from the the stem they are having issues not sure what to do 
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,156
    Do you know what type they are, and where are you?
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • Fran IOMFran IOM Posts: 1,944

  • I looked up on my orders  and we are in west valley city , ut near Salt Lake city. It is called lilac drumstick primrose allium.does that help?
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 3,422
    I can't see much wrong with them, to be honest. Yours seem to have their seed heads still maturing but they look fine. I find they self seed like mad and the 'naturally ' planted bulbs are pretty close to the surface. There's no reason why you shouldn't replant them if you want to.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,156
    I think they are Allium sphaerocephalon although here they are more purple than lilac.  They are naturally lanky so could be better planted as a group with other perennials around them for support.  Wait until they finish flowering and die down naturally before  digging up and moving. (probably September time) If you want something to make a better display along the fence, go for something like  Allium aflatunense  purple rain or purple sensation, or for even bigger flowers, Allium christophii.  Plant them around a foot apart and you will have a good display.  Plant the bulbs around four to six inches deep.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • Wow thanks so much 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,152
    I'd agree - it's A.sphaerocephalon. As said, they do best with plenty of sturdier planting for support. They can also spread very readily, so you may find you have lots in coming years. Move them in a couple of months time, although you could probably do it now without it affecting them too much.   :)
    I tend to dead head them, but if you have flowers for cutting in your garden, you can also use them for that, although once they're past their best, as in your photo, I wouldn't do it as they're not at their best.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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