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Blossom end rot

I've done a bit of research and I'm more confused than before I started. I've got BER on one plant out of 15 (4 varieties). It's a beef tomato plant, in my greenhouse and they've all been treat the same (watered every day and fed once a week). I read it could be down to several things, overwatering, irregular watering, underwatering, lack of calcium even plant stress!
Whatever one it is doesn't make any sense as only 3 of the tomatoes on the plant are showing signs of it, the others look fantastic (albeit not ripe yet).
Any advice please? I have read that although not nice looking it doesn't affect the rest of the fruit and if cut off the the rest will be fine?

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,281
    That’s usually how BER happens … affecting just a few fruit on a plant. In my experience it’s more likely to occurring on earlier fruits … others are not necessarily affected.  The larger varieties do seem to be more susceptible. 

    Just remove and discard the affected ones and hopefully most of the remainder will be fine 🤞 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • That’s usually how BER happens … affecting just a few fruit on a plant. In my experience it’s more likely to occurring on earlier fruits … others are not necessarily affected.  The larger varieties do seem to be more susceptible. 

    Just remove and discard the affected ones and hopefully most of the remainder will be fine 🤞 
    This is probably a case of exactly the opposite, as the affected fruit is close to the top of the plant wherehas the fruit near the bottom (so presumably the early ones) are the ones unaffected.
    I've been growing stuff for 30+ years and don't understand it :(
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,281
    One fruit on one plant in 30 years?!

    Then all I can say is that it’s your turn 🤣 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,064
    The plant can't get enough calcium to that area is the reason why it rots.
    The reason the plant get calcium to the area is related to watering unless the plant shows signs of calcium deficiency and lots of fruit have it.

    I get a few every year with BER - c'est la vie..

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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