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Wild flowers

LynfromSeaLynfromSea Posts: 71
Does anybody know what type of flowers these are and why the farmer would be growing them. The blue one is fragrant but it’s not prickly.  I had the pleasure of walking through this field this morning and it looked stunning!

 


Posts

  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 2,024
    I think the first could be Phacelia. Second a cardamine?
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 34,485
    Phacelia is grown as a green manure and the farmer will plough it back into the soil to enrich it. This can be done on a smaller scale in ordinary gardens. Another plus point for phacelia is that bees absolutely love it.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,926
    edited 17 July
    1. Phacelia...see pics below.
    2 Something in the cabbage/brassica family...near me they are growing fields of radish...(Raphanus raphanistrum subsp. sativus)
    Not for human food...maybe green manure or  for local biodigester.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • LynfromSeaLynfromSea Posts: 71
    Ladybird4 said:
    Phacelia is grown as a green manure and the farmer will plough it back into the soil to enrich it. This can be done on a smaller scale in ordinary gardens. Another plus point for phacelia is that bees absolutely love it.
    Thank you so much for your suggestion. I’m sure that’s what it is. 
  • LynfromSeaLynfromSea Posts: 71
    Phacelia it is then! Thank you all so much for detecting it. This forum has a wealth of knowledge which you are so willing to share. I think I will grow some in my garden as it so pretty and as you say, so good for the bees 
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,995
    I have a little patch in a border, it self seeds every year and I edit as necessary. Adored by the bees and loved by me, although it doesn't die well.
    Consequences, altered cases
    Broken noses, altered faces
    My ego altered, altered egos
    Wherever I go, so does me go
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,480
    edited 17 July
    Phacelia is usually grown nowadays, in this area at least, to provide nectar for pollinators.  If it’s grown as a green manure it’s usually ploughed in before it flowers. 

    The second pic looks like a field of Winter Wild Bird Seed Mix.  I can see several types of plants there including Fodder radish. 

    Farmers are encouraged to grow Fodder radish and many other plants to provide seeds for birds in the winter … see here

    https://www.gov.uk/countryside-stewardship-grants/winter-bird-food-ab9  

    Also check out this place on Fbook
    https://www.highashfarm.com/

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,480
    Farmers buy the seeds in these types of various mixes depending on the scheme they’re taking part in 
    https://www.farmseeds.co.uk/products/environmental/stewardship-mixtures/wild-bird-seed-mixtures/
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LynfromSeaLynfromSea Posts: 71
    Phacelia is usually grown nowadays, in this area at least, to provide nectar for pollinators.  If it’s grown as a green manure it’s usually ploughed in before it flowers. 

    The second pic looks like a field of Winter Wild Bird Seed Mix.  I can see several types of plants there including Fodder radish. 

    Farmers are encouraged to grow Fodder radish and many other plants to provide seeds for birds in the winter … see here

    https://www.gov.uk/countryside-stewardship-grants/winter-bird-food-ab9  

    Also check out this place on Fbook
    https://www.highashfarm.com/

    I like the idea that it is grown for bird seed but I was wondering whether the farmers were now growing their own fertiliser as their supply, I believe, has been cut due to the war in Ukraine.
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