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Pruning Advice please for recently transplanted Weigela

We transplanted this mature weigela ca 3 weeks ago, ( bad timing, we knew, but it's owners wanted it out). It survived the move very well although it was towards the end of its main blooming cycle here in Ontario, Canada. You can see one red bloom towards right, and there is already new growth quite a bit taller. The picture was taken 1 week after the move ( 2 weeks ago), and there was growths since then.  We wanted to let it settle a bit before disturbing it any further by pruning, although we knew it should ideally be pruned right after blooming.  If I want an even shape and prune to where that one bloom shows on the pic. I will have to sacrifice the new growth and thereby next year's flowers, right?
This bush had not been pruned well before, it seems just chopped across old and newer branches. The lower area is quite naked as you can see. I read recommendations to take out up to 1/3 of old growth in late fall or early spring. Do I have to wait this long ? I want to encourage new growth from the bottom up A.S. A. P. There are two rather fat and crooked branches, marked in red that I  think should go. Would cutting them out now hurt the bush, or encourage new growth from the bottom up that might flower next year?  

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,909
    Take about 1/3rd. of the old stems out at ground level, repeat this over 3 years, you therefore replace whole shrub. New shoots grow from ground level.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • dottywdottyw Posts: 14
    Thank you, that is my plan. The question is, can I take out some stems at the ground level now, as well as trim / prune from the top?
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,617
    edited 13 July
    I would take the fattest, oldest stems out now, and that one that's sticking out on the left in your first picture. The ones that you leave should flower next spring, then take some more out when the flowers have faded. 1/3 of the stems each time is often recommended but you can do fewer at a time if you like.
    Edit: I wouldn't shorten the other stems at the same time other than to tidy up any diseased or damaged bits. They tend to make tufts of new shoots from just below the cut which I don't much like the look of, whereas taking a few branches out right down to the ground encourages new stems from the base.
  • dottywdottyw Posts: 14
    Yeah, mostly all right now are tufts of growth just below the last cut that went straight across the bush, and I don't like the look of it either.  I was thinking of pruning at that same last cutting level, to shorten and shape the bush, but I suspect then I won't see any blooms next year ? 
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,909
    No, that won’t work, you will just end up with what you already have. You need to properly rejuvenate it by removing stems from the base.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • dottywdottyw Posts: 14
    . Ok. I get it now! I'll prune two to three fat stems now, and will follow your advice! Much appreciated! Thank you! 
  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 7,879
    You should prune hard before moving, not sure if it's the same as the UK, August and February are the pruning times, realistically no flowers for at least 3years

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