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Distorted growing tips on tomato plants in Levingtons Original Growbag

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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,143
    Lyn said:
    I thought that weedkillers became inert after a length of time,  seems that’s not so.
    The RHS article says that bacteria should break it all down in about 1 year

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • LynLyn Posts: 23,090
    That’s what I thought,  which is why we are advised to use ‘well rooted’ manure. 
    I think the compost manufacturers are under pressure to get it out there for the public to buy,  they’re just not waiting long enough,  which is why most of it looks as if it hasn’t broken down enough.
    Maybe people should buy bags of compost this year and keep it for next. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • PlashingPlashing Posts: 328
    I think that might be a good idea Lyn, you could mix it with your own compost to hurry the process, I usually put my spent compost from my tomatoes and tubs in the compost bin with all my veg peelings, weeds and pruning's kit works well for me.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,143
    When I get a bulk load of compost, I buy it bagged (usually 40 x 70L bags) around the end of August.
    I barrow it up the garden and stack it out of the way.
    Buy the time I use it, around April it's full of worms - and extremely heavy having soaked up winter rain. But it looks good and the worms are thriving so all is good.

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • MikeOxgreenMikeOxgreen Posts: 805
    Pete.8 said:
    When I get a bulk load of compost, I buy it bagged (usually 40 x 70L bags) around the end of August.
    I barrow it up the garden and stack it out of the way.
    Buy the time I use it, around April it's full of worms - and extremely heavy having soaked up winter rain. But it looks good and the worms are thriving so all is good.
    You need to cover it up really, the rain will wash the nutrients out.
  • Has anybody used the seeds from the free GW package last year ( cherry tomatoes by Mr F)?

     I was wondering before that the leaves look weird from half of the plant to the top and thought that variety was genetically changed. Reading this, I used the usual Tomorite compost to top up the existing raised bed, but realise that this is also by that company Levingston. Also the Tomorite feed is weird. I have been growing tomatoes since 2016 and never had the issue  that a) the bottom had loads of sticky stuff and b) there was so much foam when filling the water can, it looked like washing liquid. I binned that and bought seaweed. 

    I don’t feel at all comfortable with my this year’s tomatoes and having weed killer in them is a no-go. 

    I my garden.

  • Tortoise19Tortoise19 Posts: 13
    I have a good crop of tomatoes on the bottom half of trusses where leaves are ok as well. I think these will be ok to eat. The top half where the distortion of the leaves occurred have odd shaped fruit - small, pointed ovals. I don’t think these are going to grow properly and will not eat them. 
    Levingtons insist problem is due to over watering but I don’t share this view. They have changed the mix in the bags - more wood fibre to replace peat. Maybe the mix needs tweaking. Cucumber continues to grow well and fruit is fine in same bag as tomatoes - hence me doubting it is down to watering or excessive hot temperatures. Annoying and will be rethinking the growing medium for next year. 
    My plot isn’t big enough for large compost bins and the only space would be in the shade so will need to buy it in. 
    Still find peat free composts don’t hold water well so will be looking to mix them with loam or another medium. 
    I am not convinced peat free composts are right yet - mix needs improving and I know ingredients used are imported so not sure what the carbon footprint is. This information is missing from bags.
  • So, I'm not the only one who noticed a weird, confusing grow.
    Another indication that something is not right is that my tomatoes start pinkish. Never had that before.
    With the upcoming hose pipe ban, I have no problem to get rid of the tomato plants.

    I my garden.

  • EustaceEustace Posts: 2,120
    I got rid of the tomato plants repotted with weedkiller-contaminated compost. IMHO, it is not worth growing them any further. They were doing well in their pots before this repotting/compost misadventure. 🥴
    Oxford. The City of Dreaming Spires.
    And then my heart with pleasure fills,
    And dances with the daffodils (roses). Taking a bit of liberty with Wordsworth :)

  • WilderbeastWilderbeast Posts: 1,415
    The main herbicide in question is aminopyralid this will only break down when in close contact with soil, mixed into compost does not break it down. I had an issue last year with horse manure which came from a local farm, they had sprayed using said chemical not knowing the restrictions on treating grass for horse feed.

    I contacted Charles Dowding and he did explain that the contaminated soil needed to be well dug or rotavated to mix the compost and soil together. I've had issues this year and have been much more careful on where to get manure from. The active chemical ingredient will remain active in compost for years, in fact if this chemical is sprayed on a wheat crop it's advised not grow beans on the same field for 4 years 
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