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blueberry plant browning / falling flowers

hi, i am quite new to the gardening world.

i am looking for some advice. I have 2 blueberry plants in grow bags, both are in ericacheous compost, one is Alvar variety the other is mini blue.

They have both been treated the same, but unforunately the Alvar one seems to be taking a turn for the worst; yet the other one is thriving.

Can anyone identify the issue with this here? Before, it was nice white flowers all over, but now a lot have started falling off (wind?) , or they are looking like they are browning and dying. It doesn't look well.


Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,545
    Can you see tiny berries left where the petals have gone?
    My Patriot blueberry has now lost most of its flowers but there are plenty of tiny berries beginning to form.
    My other 2 are still in flower
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 3,613

  • dean25800dean25800 Posts: 3
    thanks for quick response, pete!

    i'm unsure, i'm quite new to this, but to me it looks like theyre dying.

    here's a closer look.


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,600
    First of all, if you can, move the two blueberries to their own pot with drainage holes and with all their compost and roots.   If you've used ordinaty grow bags, take the opportunity to replace as much of the compost as possible with ericaceous John Innes no 3 type mixed with up to a third ericaceous multi-purpose compost for moisture retention.    They'll thus be less prone to being waterlogged and also fried in summer. 

    Blueberries are woodland edge plants which need a moist but well-drained ericaceous compost or soil.   The presence of any lime or calcium in their growing medium or water can prevent them taking up iron and magnesium thru their roots and that leads to anaemia and chlorosis which affect both the colour of their leaves and their ability to photosynthesise sunlight into energy for the plants.

    It's hard to see from the photos but as blossom dies it does tend to go brown so taht's nothing to worry about.  If they've been pollinated they will now start producing fruits so correct feeding and watering is important and you may want to consider netting them to keep the birds off.  In my experience they swoop just before teh fruit is rip enough for us to eat.

    Not all blueberries flower at the same exact time so the other may just be a bit behind.  Good to have the two tho as that helps with cross pollination and higher yields.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • dean25800dean25800 Posts: 3
    Obelixx said:
    First of all, if you can, move the two blueberries to their own pot with drainage holes and with all their compost and roots.   If you've used ordinaty grow bags, take the opportunity to replace as much of the compost as possible with ericaceous John Innes no 3 type mixed with up to a third ericaceous multi-purpose compost for moisture retention.    They'll thus be less prone to being waterlogged and also fried in summer. 

    Blueberries are woodland edge plants which need a moist but well-drained ericaceous compost or soil.   The presence of any lime or calcium in their growing medium or water can prevent them taking up iron and magnesium thru their roots and that leads to anaemia and chlorosis which affect both the colour of their leaves and their ability to photosynthesise sunlight into energy for the plants.

    It's hard to see from the photos but as blossom dies it does tend to go brown so taht's nothing to worry about.  If they've been pollinated they will now start producing fruits so correct feeding and watering is important and you may want to consider netting them to keep the birds off.  In my experience they swoop just before teh fruit is rip enough for us to eat.

    Not all blueberries flower at the same exact time so the other may just be a bit behind.  Good to have the two tho as that helps with cross pollination and higher yields.

    i have uploaded more photos , from those do you think that's normal?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,325
    edited 10 May
    I wouldn't be worried. It's how the fruit is produced - assuming there's been pollination , as said.  :)
    Re drainage - that's important. How are those bags supported? I'd have thought they'd be soggy at the bottom, unless there's some kind of support to keep them clear of the ground. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,545
    edited 10 May
    What sort of grow-bags have you used - they look as if they're in pots.

    I agree with what @Obelixx says, but not sure if now is the right time to move them unless you're very careful.
    Mine are in 15L pots with a John Innes type of ericaceous compost.
    When they start growing in Spring I use Miracle Grow soluble fertilizer for Azaleas and Rhododendrons once a month. I always use rain water for feeding and watering.
    They don't mind being a bit damp, so best to overwater rather than underwater.

    The petals of the flowers have fallen, but the stalks remin which means that berries are likely forming - you can see swelling behind the petals - that swelling should turn out to be a berry.



    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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