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White spots on my Hosta leaves.

ErgatesErgates Devon, east of ExeterPosts: 2,037
Anyone know what these are? Found them on all the Hosta leaves yesterday. They weren’t there the day before. All wiped off easily with a damp cloth. 

Posts

  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,082
    Could it be damage of some kind?
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • ErgatesErgates Devon, east of ExeterPosts: 2,037
    Don’t think so, Suze. I wiped them with a damp cloth and they came off. The leaves look a little bumpy in places.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,022
    I wonder if it's the start of leaf miner? I didn't think hostas were susceptible to them though, and their damage is quite distinctive.
    The bumps suggest something of that sort, and if it is, you can squish them by holding each side of the leaf with thumb and forefinger. Pea foliage gets attacked by them here.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ErgatesErgates Devon, east of ExeterPosts: 2,037
    Just checked my Hosta leaves, and once again, they are covered in white spots. I took a look at them through a x10 magnifying glass and they look like drifts of what could be tiny yellowish eggs. They all wiped off easily with a damp cloth.
    However, I’ve just noticed similar on the garden chairs, and I can’t imagine any insects laying their eggs on aluminium! I’m now wondering if this might actually be Scots Pine pollen! We have quite a few trees nearby, and when there is a breeze, I can see puffs of pollen, almost like smoke, coming off the little cone flowers.
    Does anyone know what pine pollen looks like?

  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,082
    @Ergates This is really interesting just cheated and looked on line as I had no idea. Yes it is yellowish and can look like smoke when it is blown around. It is visible to the naked eye unlike other pollens.  Hopefully there will be more comments. The air is very dry which might have something to do with it?
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 1,273
    I'm not sure about this, and can't check as my 63 ft high Scots pine was uprooted in Storm Arwen, and is now logs and mulch, but I've a feeling/memory of the new growth buds on the pine having sort of papery sheaths over them. I wonder if it's that?

    The pollen was visible when a branch was disturbed as has been said, almost like a puff of smoke.
  • ErgatesErgates Devon, east of ExeterPosts: 2,037
    Just been down to the garage with the x10 magnifier! The car has been covered in pollen, and I haven’t got round to washing it yet. It does look as if it is the same stuff all over the car! Maybe the mystery is solved! 
    Interestingly, while searching for information on what Scots Pine pollen looks like, I came across lots of recipes for using it, plus claims for its supposed health benefits. Maybe instead of washing the car, I should consider licking it clean! The windscreen might provide some additional insect protein as well. Not recommended for hay fever sufferers!
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