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What to put here…

Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 123
The hydrangeas never really got going sadly. It’s quite shaded as sits under woodland. Current thoughts is a tree fern unless anyone has some other suggestions? 


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  • bertrand-mabelbertrand-mabel Posts: 1,486
    We have 2 tree ferns in very shady areas in the garden sheltered from the winds by shrubs and trees. They do very well and are a great architectural plant. If you go down this route you do need to keep the "trunk" well watered.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,136
    I have looked after a tree fern for someone it needed watering every day and some times twice. not sure if it is ok with tap water?
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 123
    Hmmm not sure I can keep up the watering regime, may look for something else 
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,136
    @Wrigs21 I do think they are alot of work and they also need winter protection here.
    You say that your hydrangas have sadly failed are they actually dead. Did they get enough water, they like a damp soil.You need to spend your money on something that is going to thrive in your situation. Could you describe the soil is it clay? Are the growing conditions dry? There will be alternatives.
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 123
    @Wrigs21 I do think they are alot of work and they also need winter protection here.
    You say that your hydrangas have sadly failed are they actually dead. Did they get enough water, they like a damp soil.You need to spend your money on something that is going to thrive in your situation. Could you describe the soil is it clay? Are the growing conditions dry? There will be alternatives.
    Yeah never really got going. I’ll stick them in a pot and see if I can bring back to life. It’s a South West facing garden with clay soil so not ideal. The bed however sits underneath woodland so tends to be shady with a touch of sun early on 
  • Slow-wormSlow-worm Posts: 32
    I'd fill that shady bit full of astrantias, foxgloves & Japanese anemones. ❤😁
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,136
    There is a lovely fern called Polystichum setiferum that looks good with Asarum europaeum. Perhaps white Helleborous Orientalis, wood anemones, pulmonaria Diana Clare,  Geranium phaum Album, G macrorrhizum White ness and are a few possibles but none will give you alot height  @Slow-worm has suggested Japanese Anemones I would go for white again in shade. white for later in the season. You could choose just a few plants and repeat them which will work well. The fern and Hellebores will give you some evergreen for the winter months.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,121
    The white Jap. anemones do best with decent moisture in my experience, and judging by the many comments on the forum we get about them. They don't thrive so readily if it's too dry.  The pink ones are less fussy.
    If it's dry shade, then you need to look for plants that will tolerate that.  :)

    South west facing, and clay soil isn't a problem, but dry clay is. It's worth adding some organic matter anyway, to try and beef it up a bit. That gives you more scope too.

    Long Acre Nursery is a good place to start researching   :)
    https://www.plantsforshade.co.uk/
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,136
    All of my suggestions grow in my garden in a clay soil. I would add that alot of work has been done over many years to improve it. If you have any doubts start with improving your soil before investing in plants
  • SendmesunSendmesun Scotland Posts: 55
    edited 7 May
    Just a thought. Is that area lined on the sides or could the moisture be leaking out between the sleepers? My shady area has honesty, Japanese anenomes, centaurea Montana (perenial cornflowers), geraniums (war grave pink), and its where I resite all the self seeding foxgloves. Gives a reasonable spread of interest over the seasons. 
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