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Aeonium

Kev121Kev121 Posts: 66
What type of a aeonium is this please. 
All the leaves are a dark red.

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  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 13,027
    It looks like Schartzkopf, but I am no expert.
    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.
  • BiljeBilje Posts: 727
    Looks just like my schartzkopf. Lost several large ones over the winter but cuttings taken in Autumn and overwintered in cold greenhouse are doing fine. 
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,739
    Its always a good idea to do cuttings if you only have one plant. As the others say, it is easy to lose them over the Winter. Cuttings are very easy.

    Just cut off one of the florets, where it meets the main stem. You want to try and get about 10cm of stem.  Leave it aside, somewhere not too sunny, for a couple of days or so, so that the end of the stem develops a callous. You then put it into a pot of very free-draining compost, with about half of the stem below the compost level.  About 50% horticultural grit and 50% compost would do, or if you have money to throw away, you could buy a specialist succulent compost mix.

    I usually give the cuttings a tiny bit of water when I plant them in their new pot, however the UK's National Collection Holder of Aeonium's was on GW last week, and she said she doesn't water them for several weeks after putting the cuttings into their new pot. They are prone to infestations of aphid/whitefly. You can mix up some washing up liquid with water, in a spray bottle, and you can use this to blast them off the plant.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,313
    edited April 2022
    If that was mine, I'd cut all those stems back , leaving about 3cm and use the rest as cuttings as described by @KeenOnGreen
    The spurs left behind would put out new growth, as that one did when the top was taken off.
    Devon.
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,739
    It's funny you say that @Hostafan1 I cut all of the flowers off my two main plants recently, as they were too leggy, and now I have loads of cuttings.

    I find that Schwarzkopf does the least well after Winter, than the other two varieties I have. Perhaps it's more susceptible to the cold and damp, although they recover very well by the Summer.

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,313
    edited April 2022
    mine live in an unheated polytunnel but my nearest neighbour leaves her's outdoors all winter, just tucked against the house
    Devon.
  • Kev121Kev121 Posts: 66
    Hi
    I have made a big mistake,  I accidentally left my aeonium outside and it got frost so disappointing. 
    So is there anything  I can do to selvedge this  plant.....
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,313
    wait and see if it recovers is your only option I'm afraid
    Devon.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 8,874
    Technically it's known by the Dutch name 'Zwartkop' as it was originally a cultivar created in Holland, but the German name seems to be used just as often now. I brought one of mine in for the winter and it turned a lighter green because of the lower light levels. When I put it back out in the greenhouse in April it got badly sunburned, which tells you why it has the red colouring. Just something to be aware of.
    Tradition is just peer pressure from dead people
  • BiljeBilje Posts: 727
    Kev121 said:
    Hi
    I have made a big mistake,  I accidentally left my aeonium outside and it got frost so disappointing. 
    So is there anything  I can do to selvedge this  plant.....
    Hi Kev I posted earlier. One of mine, 3 feet tall, almost totally collapsed over the winter. Most of the stems went soggy. I just left it next to the compost bin..I’ve now seen that one branch has a tuft of growth at the top and a few tiny buds on the stem. It won’t survive as a mature plant but I’ll leave the new growth to develop and use it as cuttings. So there’s always hope.
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