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Sedum Patch

Alan.F.Alan.F. Central Scotland - Ochil HillsPosts: 21
Hi, Only really started doing any gardening this time last year, my strategy was to buy whatever was reduced and plant it  :) probably planted way to much, too close. Anyway I'm in the process of tiding a patch up and would like to plant sedums. I believe they need well drained soil so have purchased grit to mix with the soil. My question is would it be OK to have then surrounded with bark or would that retain to much moisture ? Don't really want to put down gravel as it's a kind of woodland area of the garden (very small front garden).

Thank you
Alan.

Posts

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,106
    Which kind of sedum? There are lots but I think most of them like sun, not woodlandy conditions. There are probably some exceptions though.
  • Alan.F.Alan.F. Central Scotland - Ochil HillsPosts: 21
    Hi Jenny, it's a mix to be honest, already got some of the smaller ground cover ones but also ordered some larger ones like sunsparkler (4 different kinds) and autumn joy. I picked up some at the end of last year that are just starting to come on in pots. To be honest it it the smaller ones I'm more worried about with the bark. 
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,179
    @Alan.F.  Great to know you have just got into gardening. When you start out it is best to know how important it is to plant for the right conditions. I don't know if you have seen a sedum roof. That will give you some idea what kind of conditions sedums like full sun.  Also is your soil clay and that is why you want to add grit? Not sure I can see sedums with a bark mulch either sorry.  You say you have lots of plants not too late for a swap for something else maybe?
  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,550
    I put bark down last year in my front garden as a mulch and the sedums are fine with it. 

    As long as the soil, aspect and drainage are right I don’t think they care what’s around them. 


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,292
    I grow Autumn Joy in quite shady aspects, and it's fine - apart from the slugs destroying the foliage, but it's best with decent conditions. You'll need a lot of grit if the soil's heavy. Pea gravel is better, although if you've got them in a woodland-y setting, do you mean they're are trees and shrubs around? That could make the soil more suitable, due to the competition.
    If you also have the low growing ones, I wouldn't use bark for them. Great hiding places for the aforementioned slugs  ;)

    Have you got some sun over there in the Ochils @Alan.F.?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 1,685
    If you want a woodland effect, sedums are best avoided. Sunny aspect and well drained for them so if you have a space which offers this, pop your sedums in there , forget the bark and then concentrate on your woodland site.
    I understand if you are just starting your garden to go for cheap/reduced plants but unless they are suitable for your site, it's probably a waste of money - not to mention time and effort trying to grow something which is'nt suitable.
    Perhaps a photo of the area and a bit more info on the aspect/location may enable people to offer some advice/ideas :) .
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,106
    Autumn Joy does better in full sun for me. I had one that was fine until a nearby shrub got big enough to cast a bit of shade, then the sedum grew much more leggy and floppy. I had to google Sunsparkler but apparently they like full sun too. You'd need to check the individual requirements for the small ones. I don't think bark would be harmful for the bigger ones as long as the soil isn't soggy, but for me it wouldn't look right.
  • Alan.F.Alan.F. Central Scotland - Ochil HillsPosts: 21
    Fairygirl said:
    I grow Autumn Joy in quite shady aspects, and it's fine - apart from the slugs destroying the foliage, but it's best with decent conditions. You'll need a lot of grit if the soil's heavy. Pea gravel is better, although if you've got them in a woodland-y setting, do you mean they're are trees and shrubs around? That could make the soil more suitable, due to the competition.
    If you also have the low growing ones, I wouldn't use bark for them. Great hiding places for the aforementioned slugs  ;)

    Have you got some sun over there in the Ochils @Alan.F.?
    Not much sun just now 😂 Just been out clearing the space, as usual I've totally over estimated the room I have (seem to think I can get everything I want in about 10ft x 10ft). I have had an idea of using some bark from a fallen tree to split the small piece of ground into 2. Gravel one side and bark the other. There are a few shrouds, think it would be best if I took some photos this weekend.
  • Alan.F.Alan.F. Central Scotland - Ochil HillsPosts: 21
    Thanks for the replies everyone. As above I'll try and get a photo this weekend. Please give me some leaway when you see the planting 😂 I really did buy everything that was reduced last year and threw it in. Moving a couple of things about now.
  • Alan.F.Alan.F. Central Scotland - Ochil HillsPosts: 21
    Quick update, I've decided to go with gravel at the front for the smaller ground cover ones, only problem is the other half wants white gravel that I'm not keen on, she'll win  :D. When looking for the bark I've found an interesting hollow tree trunk, just have to work out how to get it half a mile or so through the woods to my garden !!
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