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Buying Ornamental Grasses on line

GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,205
Some weeks ago I purchased two plants of Stipa Gold Fontaine on line. They arrived in 9cm pots. One was well rooted but the other had very little roots. I had wanted two plants but finished up planting them as one. I emailed the nursery but no reply.

I also purchased a Miscanthus flamingo from another well know nursery again on line, in a 9cm pot one tiny piece is alive. I contacted them and another plant is on it's way to me.
I came to the conclusion that such small pieces of ornamental grass should not really be sold as they really struggle.

So if you are planning on doing the same just be aware it can be expensive to get it wrong.
Wise to check with the seller both of these companies I would say are very popular but very different in their responses. I don't wish to name and shame but worth knowing.   

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,324
    Can't go wrong with Knoll Garden for grasses.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 9,646
    I agree that Knoll Gardens is the best for grasses. I usually look at reviews on Trustpilot for companies before l buy (not just for grasses), although l appreciate that they are not 100% reliable.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,205
    @punkdoc @AnniD yes they are 100% reliable. The on line company that did not reply to my email are very well known too. Think most plants would be ok in 9cm pots but small pieces of ornamental grass just sit and do nothing.
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,676
    I have found that with the fancy echinaceas too, 9cm pots never seem to make it, even after potting on, pinching out the flowers and growing on first. I try and buy only established 2L plants now but recently resorted to a few 9cm pots again as the bigger plants appear in my GC very sporadically. Those are probably destined to fail as well.

    I remember Monty Don growing a huge tray of Stipa from seed, it would take longer, possibly, but would that be an option?
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,205
    @Nollie I also have some plants of echinacea pallida again in 9 cm pots from C Austin they seem to be doing well will be interesting to see. The paperwork that came with them said clearly plant them out, don't pot on or put in a greenhouse, as they grow year round.
    I had wanted this particular Stipa since before lock down but it was always sold out. Both were planted together and it seems to have worked. It was a special buy as a friend used to grow it. 
    I have never tried growing Stipa from seed but this year I will give it a go thank you for the idea. 
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,324
    Mine self seed fairly freely.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,676
    I think the closer to the species the easier they are, Suze, so the likes of e. Purpurea and pallida should be fine I think, planted straight out. The fancy coloured cultivars seem to need more cosseting and a good root system before they can survive. Unless it’s just me!
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,453
    Ornamental grasses do vary, I agree Miscanthus really need to be planted a bit bigger, but most of the smaller Stipas, and other small vigorous grasses, are fine at 9cm and will grow away fast.
  • earlydazeearlydaze Posts: 84
    very useful advice- thanks-- 
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,205
    I have just recieved a replacement M flamingo from[ I am happy to say] Knoll Gardens.
    The response, help and support I have recieved from them has been excellent.
    No response regarding the Stipa.
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