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Labels on plantings

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  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,434
    Fire said:
    I don't find that chinagraph work well on plastic.

    I find Stabilo Write 4 All work pretty well for outside labels.
    Thanks for the recommendation! I've just ordered some to try.

    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,837
    Chinagraph pencils are excellent. You could just sharpen it with a stanley knife, or similar, if you need a better point @JennyJ
    The so called indelible markers don't last any length of time here. Lettering gets scoured off with the weather, which is a pain if you have small plants outside for a while to grow on etc.  Chinagraph doesn't - it stays put.  :)
    I like re using plastic labels that I have, and you can sand them to get rid of anything remaining. Eventually, they do get brittle and snap though.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • WAMSWAMS Posts: 1,944
    I think it was Fairygirl on this forum who alerted me to the fact you have to use pencils on the things!

    Does anyone make little garden signs or plaques for their perennials once they are in the ground? My great-grandfather used to. It looked rather beautiful.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Posts: 4,213
    In the pre-COVID days, for one of my 'open garden' days, especially for the geek visitors I had prepared QR code labels for a selection of plants, which they were able to flash with their phone for immediate access to the plant species page with photos, etc. on my garden site. Cool! Unfortunately the slugs took a liking to either the piece of paper that the QR code was printed on (or the glue) and soon devoured my efforts. :D

    Paper QR code label glued to a slate & wood garden sign.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • WAMSWAMS Posts: 1,944
    Fabulous!!
  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 8,336
    I find black labels with white marker pen (I use Pen-Touch) are best. The white ink / paint doesn't fade like black ink. If you want to use the labels when planting into the border the black labels are camouflaged against the soil (so they don't resemble a mini graveyard of little tombstones!) and blackbirds etc seem less inclined to peck at them and redistribute them around the border.

    I have some black labels which have now been in the soil for 3 years. They are still in their proper location and the writing is still crisp and clear. I've never had a white label which has been anywhere near as permanent a solution.
    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • FireFire Posts: 18,966
    edited April 2022
    Papi Jo said:
    In the pre-COVID days, for one of my 'open garden' days, especially for the geek visitors I had prepared QR code labels for a selection of plants, which they were able to flash with their phone for immediate access to the plant species page with photos, etc. on my garden site.
    I've been thinking about this for our community garden this year, I guess somehow laminated against weather and slugs. Slate/wood would be great; something fairly subtle. @Papi Jo

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Posts: 4,213
    @Fire Yes, laminated would be good, but ... maybe expensive?
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • FireFire Posts: 18,966
    Ah, I will only do two or three labels, just brief pointers as to why the garden is there.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,837
    That's interesting @Topbird. Are the white pens easy to come by? T'interweb I presume?
    Can you buy the black labels easily too?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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