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Photinia Red Robin Hedge

My photinia red robin hedge seems to be dying. The leaves are slowly turning brown and then dropping, leaving bare branches. Has anyone any idea what can be causing this and what I can do about it. I am not able to remove this hedge due to my age. The hedge was in place when I moved into my home 10 years ago and it was so beautiful. I would appreciate any advice.
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  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,469
    Bumping up  :)
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,633
    @yvonnewillsher Can you tell us what your soil is like please, is it heavy clay? Spots on Photinia leaves are often caused by wet conditions. Browning crisp leaves are often wind scorch and cold temperatures .Could your shrubs have out grown their space? Photinias also drop leaves at this time of year and continue to do so into May. Do you have new leaves forming at the tips?
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • My soil does have some clay in it, but not too much. A few twigs look as though new leaves are trying to grow, but they are very small. I live quite high up, fairly near the Ridgeway in Wiltshire, so sometimes we do have some very strong winds. However, the problem started last year and just appears to be getting worse. Up until last year it was beautiful, so I would love to save it if possible. The hedge is 6ft tall. I have another plant further in the garden that has been allowed to grow as a tree and that one is fine.

  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,633
    @yvonnewillsher I think a photo is the best option if you can upload one? It may be upside down but no matter. I am not very good at all offering help as my computer skills are limited!
    If the other plant you refer to is also a Photinia and you think they maybe about the same age I do wonder if cold wind could be the issue. Hopefully others may offer advice not sure how long Photinias live for, my guess would be a long time? They can be pruned successfully but hopefully it won't come to that.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,312
    It is a fairly common problem with them and is usually weather related.
    Some info from the RHS may shed some light
    Scroll down a bit and click on Problems
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/photinia/growing-guide

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    Cold winds and exposed sites, especially in cold, wet areas, are the problem. Anything further in and more sheltered will be ok.
    It's why most of them look dreadful round here. The climate just doesn't suit them. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,469
    There's a load of advice here about Photinias, reading it l wonder if it is down to the cold winds.
    https://www.wykehammatureplants.co.uk/blog/caring-photinias#:~:text=Being too dry for too,help with that potential problem

    As @GardenerSuze says, if you can post a photo it would help, but don't stress too much if that's not possible. 
  • Sorry, I cannot supply a photo. However, the general comments are high winds. Thank you so much for your advice.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,633
    @yvonnewillsher I hope they soon perk up!
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • Thank you.

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