Forum home Plants

2022 - Clematis

13031323335

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,011
    edited October 2022
    @Alfie_ - yes, it's a group 3 so can be cut back hard in late winter/early spring.   Then you need to give it a good feed of slow release fertiliser for clematis, roses or tomatoes to encourage good growth and flowering.   As you see the new shoots coming thru, keep an eye on them and train them horizontally or diagonally or they'll all end up in a vertical tangle.

    Here's more info - https://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=237 

    I have a Jackmanii superba which behaves the same but is deeper purple.   Flowers for months all summer long.

    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Alfie_Alfie_ Posts: 448
    Obelixx said:
    @Alfie_ - yes, it's a group 3 so can be cut back hard in late winter/early spring.   Then you need to give it a good feed of slow release fertiliser for clematis, roses or tomatoes to encourage good growth and flowering.   As you see the new shoots coming thru, keep an eye on them and train them horizontally or diagonally or they'll all end up in a vertical tangle.

    Here's more info - https://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=237 

    I have a Jackmanii superba which behaves the same but is deeper purple.   Flowers for months all summer long.

    Perfect thanks! Yeh it really does flower for ages and the blooms are so large too. If it’s about 2m high how hard can you cut these group 3 back roughly speaking? 
  • Alfie_Alfie_ Posts: 448
    Fire said:

    The same in full flower - just about to turn.

    Lovely clematis - I think that’s the neighbours one that popped over the hedge to catch some Sun on our side 🤣


  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,011
    Very low - about 9"/23cms.  If you're nervous doing that, wait till the stems start producing buds in mid spring and then cut back to 2 buds on each stem - the second is insurance against frosts - then leave the top growth a week to wilt and then it's easier to pull out without damaging its supporting plant or structure.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Alfie_Alfie_ Posts: 448
    Obelixx said:
    Very low - about 9"/23cms.  If you're nervous doing that, wait till the stems start producing buds in mid spring and then cut back to 2 buds on each stem - the second is insurance against frosts - then leave the top growth a week to wilt and then it's easier to pull out without damaging its supporting plant or structure.
    Thanks. Do you know if I can do the same for the honey suckle growing with it too? 
  • Alfie_Alfie_ Posts: 448
    Marlorena said:
    ..difficult not to get roses in the picture as most of mine are matched, but I can't be doing without 'Niobe', I just think the colour goes so well with pink roses.. and it's never wilted for me..

    ..in the landscape with foxgloves..

    These pictures are incredible. They look like they have been taken from a magazine. 
  • FireFire Posts: 18,965
    Yes. @Marlorena is a very experienced grower and serious rosarian. She plans her plants to peak with the roses - for May/June/July and the effects are breathtaking, with that degree of focus. She's taking a break from the forum but we very much hope she will be back.
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,011
    @Alfie_ - yes, you can do renovation pruning of honeysuckles in spring, taking it back to about 2'/60cms.   Make sure you have a good support structure in place so you can train the new shoots as horizontally or diagonally as possible.   

    If you haven't already got a trellis consider using the rusty mesh that builders use to reinforce concrete and attach it to battens on a wall or posts in front of a wall or fence so there is air flow.   Tensioned wires acorss vine eyes at 30cms inervals up teh wall are another option.

    This link will help with info on care - https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/honeysuckle/climbing/growing-guide 
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Alfie_Alfie_ Posts: 448
    Obelixx said:
    @Alfie_ - yes, you can do renovation pruning of honeysuckles in spring, taking it back to about 2'/60cms.   Make sure you have a good support structure in place so you can train the new shoots as horizontally or diagonally as possible.   

    If you haven't already got a trellis consider using the rusty mesh that builders use to reinforce concrete and attach it to battens on a wall or posts in front of a wall or fence so there is air flow.   Tensioned wires acorss vine eyes at 30cms inervals up teh wall are another option.

    This link will help with info on care - https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/honeysuckle/climbing/growing-guide 
    Thanks for such a detailed response. They are already growing on that builders mesh you talk of so will get them down as you say and retrain them. Thanks  
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,011
    That's good @Alfie_ .  The metal mesh is one of my favourite supports - strong, indestructible and almost invisible even when it's bare but so discreet when clothed.  I use it for climbing roses, honeysuckle, jasmine and clematis here and in my last garden it also supported cane fruits such as black, tay and logan berries and for training pumpkins up into the sunlight to ripen better and not get slugged.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
Sign In or Register to comment.