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Installing Decking on slightly sloped garden

Hi guys,

I’m looking to install some decking in the garden. From the edge of the paving, the garden slopes down around the level of 2 bricks - you can trace from the left side of the picture.

I’d like the decking to start at the same height as the paving and then be level to the bottom of the garden. I assume due to the slight height difference, at the bottom of the decking it will be raised compared to the grass next to it and will have to step off of it. Is this complicated to do? Or would I be better off levelling the grass first? 

Any other tips and advice would be greatly appreciated.

thanks! 

Posts

  • owd potterowd potter Posts: 692
    why decking particularly?
    it would be much simpler just to extend your paving over the area.
    Much less fuss in the long run too.
    Just another day at the plant...
  • harry.huntharry.hunt Posts: 13
    why decking particularly?
    it would be much simpler just to extend your paving over the area.
    Much less fuss in the long run too.
    I actually thought it would be simpler with decking because of the slope, would that not be the case? My think is with the slope it would be easier to build the decking level and just allow a step off it towards the end of the garden. Whereas extending the paving would mean levelling out both the area for the paving but also laying quite a lot of top soil next to it to build the other level up. Is that right? 
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,565
    I extended paving outside my house to form a terrace area, descending a much greater slope. It involved setting in and levelling wooden shuttering below the level of the existing tiles (allowing room to build up the new paving to the level of the existing ones with tile adhesive) and then pouring and levelling concrete to the top of the shuttering. It’s a simple building job. Whether you build the soil/grass level up or not would be the same for decking or paving. I just faced the sloping edge of the exposed concrete base with the same paving and left the grass as was. Remember you want the vertical facing tiles sitting under the top paving slabs, like a step. It would be much more durable than decking and look better than mixing materials, I think, but unless you are very handy, you might need to pay a builder to do it, whereas decking is an easier diy job.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,027
    Not difficult at all. It's one of the big advantages of decking over other forms of hard surfacing.
    Just factor in some steps. 2 bricks of a difference is virtually nothing  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • owd potterowd potter Posts: 692
    Hiya @""harry.hunt"
    Decking is fine in certain applications but I guess I just have a preference for hard surfacing for it's longevity and absence of ongoing maintenance issues. 
    There are certain tasks which you would need to do in either case, stripping the turf and topsoil, at least partially, and digging out a foundation or post holes to take your bearer posts for your deck structure.
    Personally I would lay a strip footing and build a dwarf wall on it to paving level, fill with hardcore, you already have a perfect retaining structure, and pave it.
    Equally, you could do as @Nollie suggested and install a line of vertical paving slabs haunched with concrete to act as your front retaining structure.
    cheers

    Just another day at the plant...
  • WeaverFishWeaverFish Posts: 3
    edited 29 March
    Never use grooved decking. Hardwood flat board decking only. Grooved ones are very difficult to maintain. Decking installation can be a difficult  task. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,027
    Never use grooved decking. Hardwood flat board decking only. Grooved ones are very difficult to maintain. Decking installation can be a difficult  task. 
    Really not true - either about grooved decking or installation  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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