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RUN DOWN SCRAWNY CORDYLINES RED STAR

UnionworkerukUnionworkeruk Posts: 137
Bought these a year ago and they thrived throughout the summer. Estimated height was only 1.2 metres and now about 60cm, not much higher than when I bought them, which suits me  but they all now look as scrawny as this one. I have no idea if I should do anything or just leave them  Any advice  ?

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,129
    It largely depends on your location and climate for those, especially the coloured ones. They need a sunny site with well drained soil.
    They're popular coastal plants because they cope with those conditions, especially the bog standard green ones,  but cold, wet, windy, winter weather isn't so good for them, and it's worse if the soil isn't free draining.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • UnionworkerukUnionworkeruk Posts: 137
    Thanks for the quick reply  I am in London and they are in the sunniest position I can find, from about 12 onwards. Probably less wet than most areas and sheltered from wind so do I live in hope, cut them back somehow or  cut my loses and dig them up and replace with some plants that are more robust. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,129
    Tricky then, because in theory, they should do quite well. I don't grow them because they tend to look lousy here in our climate, and I often see rubbishy looking ones in gardens!
    There's a lot of stuff around them which possibly doesn't help, but you could certainly cut them back and they'll re shoot - often from various points, which might be the best solution. Then if they still don't do very well, you can take a view on whether you want to replace them.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • PlantmindedPlantminded WirralPosts: 1,008
    Unfortunately the red Cordylines never look healthy as they age, with browning, drooping leaves making a very sorry sight.  They are fine when young and used in mixed container plantings.  I'd cut my losses and remove them if I were you. There's lots of better plants that would enjoy that situation.
  • UnionworkerukUnionworkeruk Posts: 137
    Only had them a year but by the look of them you are right. Cut my losses and get some plants that look as though they are still alive.  Thanks   
  • UnionworkerukUnionworkeruk Posts: 137
    Fairygirl said:
    Tricky then, because in theory, they should do quite well. I don't grow them because they tend to look lousy here in our climate, and I often see rubbishy looking ones in gardens!
    There's a lot of stuff around them which possibly doesn't help, but you could certainly cut them back and they'll re shoot - often from various points, which might be the best solution. Then if they still don't do very well, you can take a view on whether you want to replace them.  :)

    I think I will try that with a couple to see how it goes and replace the others  with some plants that look as though they are alive.At least I might learn something
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,129
    If you like the general look of a more formal, structural plant, try Phormiums instead.
    They can get a bit tatty over winter [or they do here]  but you can remove old foliage right back into the base, and new foliage will come away easily.
    You can also split them when they get a bit hefty. More plants for free!
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • UnionworkerukUnionworkeruk Posts: 137
    I have a couple and they still look healthy after the winter and dont need any attention. The appeal of the Cordylines was that they were small and advertised to only grow to 1.2m. I have cut a couple back to see what happens but will replace the others with some Lily Night Riders I have already ordered 
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