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Shrubs & Trees for a border in the shade

Looking for help .  We are just fininshing off some building work in our garden and need to replant from scratch, it is a blank canvas.
Our back garden is south east facing and due to the design layout the main border will run along a 6ft fence. This border will get the sun up until around 10am and then be in the shade.
Its a small garden so we are looking for plants, shurbs or tall slim trees as long as the trees don't create too much more shade in the garden.
Also, everything needs to be low maintenance.
And suggestions please.

Posts

  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,042
    Just wondered if you could post a photo of the border you will get lots of help if others can see it.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,042
    Also can you give any in on your soil and if you live north or south UK or elsewhere please.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,940
    The size of the space will dictate what you plant too.
    Loads of shrubs/small trees will suit, but we need more info as @GardenerSuze says.
    A photo of the space will be even more helpful  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks. I live in Maidenhead in Berkshire. Google tells me that is 'Well drained flinty coarse loamy and gravelly soils'
    Please see photo uploaded of Garden WIP. As I said, it is a blank canvas.
    The sun comes up and shines on the rear of the house and goes around clockwise to the right of the photo.
  • Recomendations please.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,940
    Is the photo taken from the house, or is that the house on the left? 
    Is it going all down that right hand fence, and how wide are you making the border? 
    All sorts of plants will suit, depending on moisture levels. The area next to the fence will be drier.
    If that fence is more north east facing, rather than north west , choices can be slightly trickier, but most of the following would be fine.
    Amelanchiers will be fine and some Prunus - there's a tall narrow one whose name escapes me for now. Plenty of shrubs too - Viburnums, Exochorda, Deutzia, Weigela, Spireas - especially the white ones. White flowering plants, in particular, are good. The white broom - Cytisus- will cope with some shade too, and is excellent for a bright display. Lots of others too, depending on the overall border size. 
    Plenty of perennials too, depending on how much room you will have. Better to work out the depth [front to back] of the border, and the eventual sizes of shrubs/trees first, before choosing the mid storey, and ground cover planting.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks FairyGirl.

    Yes, photo taken from house and border will run along the fence nd go left a bit in the corner.
    The rear of our house face South East so we get sun in the morning. Then it moves clockwise around to the right of the photo. Thanks
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,042
    @darrenjforeman7jwP4VT9 Do you have any thoughts  on how you would like this border to look? Do you like plants that are contemporary ? Whatever you eventually choose keep it simple, repeating the same plant throughout a border can bring it together. As said, start with the plants that form the backbone of your border and then move on to the perennials. Also consider evergreen plants for the winter months . I guess you plan to have seating too? Sorry lots of questions but that is how you will get lots of ideas.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,940
    Same as my back garden then. All of those I mentioned would be fine. One or two might prefer a little more light, but nearer to the house will get more light, so that's the place for anything that might like a bit more sun. The back corner will be fine for Viburnum, or  Hydrangeas, and if the soil isn't alkaline, you could also look at Rhododendrons, Azaleas and Camellias too. Pieris will also be fine, and would be happy along any part of the border. 
    As @GardenerSuze says - some evergreens would be good for winter months, and most of those above are. Some Azaleas are deciduous, so always do the homework before buying. The others in my earlier post are mostly deciduous, but some Viburnums are evergreen.
    A couple of other evergreen shrubs to look at are Osmanthus [evergreen] and Pittosporum. The latter is often variegated, so that provides interest.
    Although many of those have decent flowers, that will give you ideas for a background to other colourful planting, depending on what you like.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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