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Wind burn.


Good morning. I live very near the beach and I have laurels planted. They have not done well over winter due to windburn. How do I treat these now to encourage new growth?

Thanks. 

Posts

  • B3B3 Posts: 21,537
    Is this  likely to happen again this winter?
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • UffUff SW Scotland but born in DerbyshirePosts: 1,745
    I think this is going to be an ongoing problem. The laurels might put on some new growth and then more fierce wind will scorch the shrubs again. Perhaps you should think about replacing them with wind and salt spray tolerant shrubs. 
  • B3 said:
    Is this  likely to happen again this winter?
    Yes, probably every winter. 
  • Uff said:
    I think this is going to be an ongoing problem. The laurels might put on some new growth and then more fierce wind will scorch the shrubs again. Perhaps you should think about replacing them with wind and salt spray tolerant shrubs. 
    This is my worry. They do well over summer then lose any progress over winter. 
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,230
    @a-j-stirling Perhaps a look around your neighbourhood would be a good way of finding out what will tolerate your growing conditions? Griselinia might be an option.
  • UffUff SW Scotland but born in DerbyshirePosts: 1,745
    I think you have the answer then. There are shrubs that are more fitting to the location, on this occasion though laurels aren't the ones. Is there a more sheltered spot in your garden that you could transplant them to?
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,641
    Before looking at other shrubs, I would look at the growing conditions first. The leaves appear pale and weak. If you have only just planted it in for less than two years, your shrub may be still trying to settle in. But, it could be lacking in water or even having drainage issues causing lack of nutrients to be absorbed.

    Cherry Laurels are usually tough plants when settled in, and should be able to withstand wind, even salty winds. 

    The browning of the leaf edge may also be the result of freezing temperatures followed by full sun scorching the leaves as the frost melts. I would look at all these things first.
  • Before looking at other shrubs, I would look at the growing conditions first. The leaves appear pale and weak. If you have only just planted it in for less than two years, your shrub may be still trying to settle in. But, it could be lacking in water or even having drainage issues causing lack of nutrients to be absorbed.

    Cherry Laurels are usually tough plants when settled in, and should be able to withstand wind, even salty winds. 

    The browning of the leaf edge may also be the result of freezing temperatures followed by full sun scorching the leaves as the frost melts. I would look at all these things first.
    Thanks very much. They are 2 years old this spring. Ones on the left whilst are sheltered by our neighbours fence are thriving. These poor chaps take the brunt and are not doing so well. 
  • PlantmindedPlantminded WirralPosts: 1,030
    I'd move the ones not faring well and replace them with Griselinia littoralis, as mentioned earlier.  They are ideal for windy, coastal sites so should suit that situation well.  They have a similar leaf colour and form to laurel, just more delicate, so will complement your existing planting.  They are also evergreen.
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