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Replanting star jasmine (trachelospermum) from pot into ground

peroroncinoperoroncino Posts: 74
I've got a star jasmine growing nicely up a trellis in my back garden but after it flowered profusely last summer I suffered really bad hay fever, so now I'd like to move it to the front garden.

Right now it's in a large pot and I want to put in the ground, how would I go about doing this? How far back can I cut the stems and would the plant survive the move?

The leaves are looking a bit funny and the top vines are messy since I neglected it from autumn. What would be the cause of the drooping and spotty leaves? No hard frosts recently.


Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,557
    If you were taking it from the ground to put in a pot there would be a lot of broken and damaged roots, so to minimize stress, you'd cut most of the top growth off so that what is left of the roots don't have to struggle too much to supply more water than they are able to.

    However, you're planning on doing the opposite, so root damage should be minimal.
    I'd cut it back as much as you feel you need to in order to move it.
    Maybe cut it back to 3-4ft to make it more manageable.
    Do bear in mind they need a sunny aspect to flower well.
    As you've probably noticed, as soon as flowering  is coming to an end they throw out masses of new shoots that you can tie in.
    If it's a bit pot bound, then tease out some of the roots before replanting it otherwise the roots may continue going round and round as if it were still in a pot.
    Once planted a good mulch will be a big help to get it settled again, and make sure you water it well over spring and summer.

    The red spots etc on the leaves are normal. It's thought likely to be a protective reaction to sun during the winter and probably helps to stop the plant springing into growth in the middle of winter.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,458
    edited 17 March
    Like @Pete.8 says that foliage looks perfectly fine and healthy at this time of year. Pity you have to move it. Be careful of the sap when you cut/prune it, it's irritant.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • peroroncinoperoroncino Posts: 74
    Pete.8 said:
    If you were taking it from the ground to put in a pot there would be a lot of broken and damaged roots, so to minimize stress, you'd cut most of the top growth off so that what is left of the roots don't have to struggle too much to supply more water than they are able to.

    However, you're planning on doing the opposite, so root damage should be minimal.
    I'd cut it back as much as you feel you need to in order to move it.
    Maybe cut it back to 3-4ft to make it more manageable.
    Do bear in mind they need a sunny aspect to flower well.
    As you've probably noticed, as soon as flowering  is coming to an end they throw out masses of new shoots that you can tie in.
    If it's a bit pot bound, then tease out some of the roots before replanting it otherwise the roots may continue going round and round as if it were still in a pot.
    Once planted a good mulch will be a big help to get it settled again, and make sure you water it well over spring and summer.

    The red spots etc on the leaves are normal. It's thought likely to be a protective reaction to sun during the winter and probably helps to stop the plant springing into growth in the middle of winter.

    Thanks for the advice Pete, quite a simple process it seems. I'll probably put some composted manure as mulch since that would also give it nutrients I assume. I wonder if it will explode in new growth this year :D
    Papi Jo said:
    Like @Pete.8 says that foliage looks perfectly fine and healthy at this time of year. Pity you have to move it. Be careful of the sap when you cut/prune it, it's irritant.

    Yes I love its scent and was so happy when it bloomed, only to suffer the worst hay fever I've had in ages. Maybe it was just a coincidence but I'm not keen on testing that hypothesis haha. I'm planting it in the front with a northeast aspect banking on the assumption that it will have less flowers but still look attractive.

    Good to know that the foliage is fine too, I'll be sure to wear gloves when cutting it back.
  • DedekindDedekind Posts: 169
    I have done exactly the same thing a couple of hours ago! 

    I did struggle to get it out of the pot as it was huge and heavy (50x50x50 cm). There was definitely root damage.. but I think it will cope. 
  • mandyroberts99mandyroberts99 BedfordshirePosts: 217
    What timing! I an about to plant one I bought. Its about 6ft, winding around a bamboo cane. Should I cut it down to about 4ft? Or unwind the top bit to go around the support? Or plant it as is and let it get itself aroun the support frame?
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,557
    What timing! I an about to plant one I bought. Its about 6ft, winding around a bamboo cane. Should I cut it down to about 4ft? Or unwind the top bit to go around the support? Or plant it as is and let it get itself aroun the support frame?
    No need to cut it back, just plant it as it is and water in well.
    Remove the cane and tie the shoots onto your support
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,404
    Fine if it's just on a cane as @Pete.8says. Make sure you have proper supports in place though, before it gets going.
    It's only trickier when it's as the OP's situation, and has to be cut right back in order to move it. It's also easier for the plant to establish when it doesn't have a huge amount of top growth. 
    When you buy any climber, it will have been regularly cut back during the time it's been in a pot, waiting for sale or transport.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Joyce GoldenlilyJoyce Goldenlily Posts: 1,357
    Do not worry if your plant drops a lot of its leaves after you have moved it. Star jasmine are semi evergreen and they usually drop a lot of their leaves during early Spring. All quite normal. 
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