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Mystery plant

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  • UffUff Posts: 3,199
    edited March 2022
    I have to say that I've never seen anything like that before. Has it done much damage inside the house hdl986?
    SW SCOTLAND but born in Derbyshire
  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 1,273
    I once read about romneya coming up through floorboards in a very old cottage. I would imagine it must be strong enough to pierce lime mortars.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,631
    @hdl986 It may seem strange but you could have problems propagating it. It does not establish very well at first even though it can be invasive.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • hdl986hdl986 Posts: 10
    Uff said:
    I have to say that I've never seen anything like that before. Has done much damage inside the house hdl986?
    Not exactly damage, but it is extensively present. Very etiolated in the cellar, and coming up in the room above. It hasn’t gone down through the cellar flagstones though, and I don’t think it’s gone into further brickwork inside. Maybe not strong enough with very low light levels? But I imagine the room above would be full of it if it had been left alone until summer 
  • hdl986hdl986 Posts: 10
    Woodgreen said:
    I once read about romneya coming up through floorboards in a very old cottage. I would imagine it must be strong enough to pierce lime mortars.
    Yes it’s doing this inside! I imagine the mortar in the chimney breast was damaged, but it has really worked its way in there 
  • hdl986hdl986 Posts: 10
    @hdl986 It may seem strange but you could have problems propagating it. It does not establish very well at first even though it can be invasive.
    I saw that in the video on the link that was kindly posted. What an irony! I might try to keep a bit in a pot if I can carefully extract a bit with a strong root system. It is incredibly brittle though so I think it will be hard to lift. I will also keep it a very long way from all my walls!
  • Balgay.HillBalgay.Hill Posts: 1,085
    I would be worried about water finding its way through the holes in the mortar after the plant is killed.
    Sunny Dundee
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,631
    @hdl986 This is a friends painting of R Coulteri it's petals are like tissue paper. Not sure where she painted it but a house nearby with a long drive had some growing in a border near the gate for years. The plant was 6x4ft, it would have hundreds of flowers stunning next to a blue sky .Suddenly one spring it had gone.
    I have occasionally seen it for sale in the UK but not with any warning as to what it is capable of doing!
    I hope your renovations go well.  Maybe you have some more unusual plants in your garden?  Your Romneya was probably planted by a plant enthusiast who sadly did not know it was invasive.  
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • hdl986hdl986 Posts: 10
    I would be worried about water finding its way through the holes in the mortar after the plant is killed.
    It has taken out so much mortar that the chimney breast is resting almost exclusively on plant at one level, so we will definitely be repointing!
  • hdl986hdl986 Posts: 10
    @hdl986 This is a friends painting of R Coulteri it's petals are like tissue paper. Not sure where she painted it but a house nearby with a long drive had some growing in a border near the gate for years. The plant was 6x4ft, it would have hundreds of flowers stunning next to a blue sky .Suddenly one spring it had gone.
    I have occasionally seen it for sale in the UK but not with any warning as to what it is capable of doing!
    I hope your renovations go well.  Maybe you have some more unusual plants in your garden?  Your Romneya was probably planted by a plant enthusiast who sadly did not know it was invasive.  
    That’s really interesting. Thank you. Yes, it was once a well-loved garden. I am looking forward to seeing it develop through the year and seeing whether we have any other gems (although less invasive ones would be welcome)
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