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Sycamore seedlings

TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,519
I'm currently pulling sycamore seedlings out of my drive, paths, beds, gravel on a daily basis.

We moved in a year ago and I can't remember pulling any out but this year there are LOTS.

I wondered if it is weather dependent i.e. some years there will be a few seeds and other years there will be lots.

I then saw this in the latest GW mag and wondered if you have noticed if some years you have a lot more than others.

I'm pulling out 10/15 every day at the minute!


Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,345
    It's called a 'mast year' ... hopefully it won't be as bad every year.

    https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/blog/2020/10/what-is-a-mast-year/ 🤞
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,519
    Ah!  Thanks @Dovefromabove

    I love it when I learn something new.  There's always a reason when it comes to nature.

  • thevictorianthevictorian Posts: 411
    I was just about to say a mast year before I saw dove's reply but it's not something I really associate with sycamores for some reason. It's obvious with the beech trees around us because they have years where they produce nothing but the sycamores in the same area seem to always create endless amounts of seedlings. 
    I walk the dog on our local pitch and putt regularly, which is currently filling up with sycamore seedlings all through the grass. A few years ago there must have been millions as literally every square foot of grass had them. So I guess I'm saying they seem to be a prolific tree normally but have years where they become even more prolific, or at least that's the case here.   
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,077
    There used to be a sycamore in my parents' garden and an ash tree next door. Many hours of my childhood were spent pulling out tree seedlings. I don't remember any year being worse than any other, but I suppose there must have been mast years. Maybe the two trees alternated :).
  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,519
    Interesting. 

    I’ll post back in here same time next year and report back. 👍🏼
  • thevictorianthevictorian Posts: 411
    Tbh the vast majority of the seedlings don't make it much beyond a first pair of leaves. So although they are a pain they are generally easy to control.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,345
    We certainly had mast years with our ashes … there were always a lot but some years there were a ridiculous number of seeds. 

    Friends with horses and sycamores around their grazing have certainly noted that some years are worse than others. Sycamore seeds contain a toxin dangerous for horses if eaten … and horses do eat them … IME some horses seem to have a death wish 🙄 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,077
    A horsey friend of mine says that the more highly bred the horse, the dafter it is in terms of eating anything and everything it can find.
  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,519
    edited 16 March
    JennyJ said:
    A horsey friend of mine says that the more highly bred the horse, the dafter it is 
    I think the same could be said of people….😂
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,345
    edited 16 March
    JennyJ said:
    A horsey friend of mine says that the more highly bred the horse, the dafter it is in terms of eating anything and everything it can find.
    Absolutely agree ... thoroughbreds and show ponies are a complete liability unto themseves, whereas cross-bred cobs and native ponies like Exmoors like the ones we used to have are as tough as old boots and will probably inherit the earth along with the cockroaches. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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