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Is it to early to feed and deadhead??

Hi guys it seems most of my shrubs especially my hydrangeas seem to be sprouting new growth very early this year, I’m going to feed with some fish/ blood/ bone meal today but is it to early to deadhead last year’s flower heads or am I better waiting till end of the month till spring actually starts 

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    I'd wait a little while yet, but it depends, as always, on your location and climate.
    In mild areas, where there's little chance of any frost or more severe weather, it might be ok.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,083
    @Leeendean I would go ahead and feed. I would leave the dead flower heads as they protect the new flower bud from frost damage. I would wait until late March early April but it may vary depending on where you live.
  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 114
    @Leeendean I would go ahead and feed. I would leave the dead flower heads as they protect the new flower bud from frost damage. I would wait until late March early April but it may vary depending on where you live.
    Ok thank you did think it was bit to early to deadhead I’m supriesd how much new growth is coming trough already, I’ll feed today then wait for April im in sunny Essex 
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,083
    @Leeendean I am in the South Midlands so you should be a little head of me with what you can do.
    I learnt the hard way many years ago cut all the dead flowers off in March and it did not flower at all. The best of it was I got paid for it, all was forgiven I am pleased to say.
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 2,103
    I already deadheaded, I usually do it in February. And I am the only one on our street doing it in late winter/early spring, everyone else does it in autumn (I know, we are milder than most of the UK, but still). Actually, the wind did that for me anyway, there was very little of the old flowers left, certainly nothing that would offer any protection.
    I haven't fed yet.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    It can also depend on the type of hydrangea. The bog standard pink and blue ones will take more abuse from the weather without being affected so much. If they've been around a while too, they cope better.
    We had a very warm April last year, and I cut mine back. The new growth was annihilated by the following weather, so no flowers at all. The mild weather this winter has meant there's now some new growth on them, so I'm hoping it doesn't get appreciably colder before that hardens up, because there are no spent flowers there to help protect them, and I could have the same situation again. We regularly have quite severe weather in April, so they aren't out of the woods yet   :/
    Fingers are getting crossed.

    The oak leaf ones are fine because I don't prune them. I don't feed mine either. They get a mulch if I remember. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Robert WestRobert West Posts: 133
    I've taken the heads off in Feb, March and April various years and haven't noticed any difference. They're pretty tough plants in my experience. Only time I had and issue was last year's late cold snap and strong winds decimated the young growth, but even then they looked as good as normal a month or two later. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    You must be in a very mild area then @Robert West :)
    Not everyone is so fortunate.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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