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Young Strawberry Plants

Happy my order of bare rooted strawberry plants have arrived (Cambridge Favourite, Florence and Honeoye). 

Instructions say to plant them in pots until the frosts have cleared. Surely strawberry plants overwinter in their beds quite happily. I realise they are tender, but if their crown is covered and protected with compost they'll be OK?

Due to space and convenience, I'd love to plant them in their prepared containers now.... should I take the chance?
Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 10,953
    You want the crown to be just very slightly proud of the soil surface, so don't cover it with compost.
    I can't think of any reason why they shouldn't be planted out now they're tough as old boots

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 935
    Pete.8 said:
    You want the crown to be just very slightly proud of the soil surface, so don't cover it with compost.
    I can't think of any reason why they shouldn't be planted out now they're tough as old boots
    Thank you, brilliant, that's what I wanted to hear. Thanks also for the tip about the crown, I could have caused a problem for myself. 
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

    Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 10,953
    Hope you get a great harvest :) just make sure you beat the slugs and snails to them when they're ripe
    The crown may well rot over winter if it is below the soil surface

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 53,991
    Definitely don't bury the crown  :)
    If they're small specimens, it wouldn't harm them to be grown on a little bit, but unless they've been grown undercover, they'd be fine planted out, especially if they're going into pots.
    Strawberries are 100% hardy everywhere   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 935
    Thanks @Fairygirl, I don't know if they've been grown under glass, unless I ask Suttons. The plants have quite a bit of dead browned leaves which makes it hard to think they have been molly cuddled in a greenhouse. Will defo keep the crowns in fresh air  :)
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

    Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Posts: 11,391
    Strawberry runners are kept in a chilled environment by the suppliers until they are despatched.  Outside, they won't start growing until the soil warms-up a bit if planted now, hence the option of gaining an early start by potting them up in a greenhouse first.  However, as you should remove any flowers which form in this first year, it really doesn't matter - less work to plant them outside now.  I think quite a few folk do let them fruit during their first year (including me), but if you want them to grow into larger plants for their main cropping years (2 & 3), I would recommend that you let each plant produce no more than two or 3 fruit this year.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 935
    Thanks Bob! Frustrating to wait though  :#
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

    Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 53,991
    I hardly ever remove flowers/fruits on young plants, although they don't have many. They produce so many new runners over time that it's easy to keep having new plants anyway  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Posts: 11,391
    Once you have them growing @Fairygirl it all becomes a lot easier, doesn't it! :)
    It's getting that first set growing well that is the trick - letting them crop unrestricted in the first year can lead to poor growth and a disappointing yield in year 2, especially if also planted too closely together.  Been there etc. :)
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 53,991
    I've never grown from bare root, certainly @BobTheGardener - always small plants or runners as gifts. 
    I expect it's a bit easier, but I've always found strawbs easy to grow though.

    I always seem to have some in every garden I've had, but don't even like them that much  :D  
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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