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Not hardening plants off in your part of the world: hellebore & foxglove

FireFire LondonPosts: 13,906
edited 3 March in Problem solving
This may be too big a question, but here goes: In your locale, what would happen if you left a plant in a pot outside without hardening them off first. I'm not talking about seedlings or baby plants and I'm not talking about tender annuals like a tomato or something that hates cold.

Say, a well grown hellebore or a foxglove in a three litre pot has been in your house for a few weeks. The threat of frost has passed. What effect would you expect to see if you suddenly left these plants outside.

As we know, many of the options might apply and there is nuance that isn't covered by polling options. Yes, different plants respond in different ways to everything. Much like my questions about potting on, my main thrust is: have you experimented? Do you notice a great difference? Have you killed plants this way?

Not hardening plants off in your part of the world: hellebore & foxglove 21 votes

I would expect these plants to go into shock and might die
4%
tui34 1 vote
The plant would go into shock and the growth could slow right down for a few months
9%
SuesynJenny_Aster 2 votes
There would be an inital shock, but I expect the plant would be pretty fine pretty quickly
23%
LoxleyraisingirlEustacerobairdmacraignilWatsonia 5 votes
I wouldn't expect to notice a difference if I hardened these kind of plants off or not
33%
LynRobert WestDevonianedhelkaPlantmindedpuschkiniaGardenerSuze 7 votes
I would expect a greater growth spurt from a hardened off plant once outside
0%
Without hardening off a plant would never reach its optimal size over the growing season
0%
shrug
4%
Hostafan1 1 vote
other
23%
FairygirlPete.8Nanny BeachTheGreenManJennyJ 5 votes
«13

Posts

  • B3B3 Posts: 21,415
    Nowhere much inside so they start off outside and that's where they stay. Instinctively, I'd say that makes for a sturdier plant but what do I know?🙄
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,492
    other
    I don't grow hellebores from seed as they seem to do a fine job in the garden without my help.
    Foxgloves - I sow them in seed trays covered with grit and leave outside until germinated in late Summer. Then pot them on and leave them outside. Depending on size they get planted out in late Autumn or early Spring.
    Neither has any need for additional warmth around here.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,506
    other
    I didn't think Hellebore would need mollycoddling.  I took mine from GC to garden; plonked them in; we had a hard frost the next morning and they looked petrified but are loving life now.

    I've always left my purchases outside against the back of the house if I've not planted them straight away.  Not sure if that has stunted their growth in any way.

    I guess you'd need to find two identical plants and treat them differently at the same time to know if it changes anything but are two plants ever that alike?

    My head hurts....
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,060
    edited 3 March
    other
    Even small plants /seedlings of those two plants would never need to be undercover.
    I leave small [2 or 3 inch pots] examples outside all year round here. The most they'd get would be tucked against a wall, or in amongst other plants. 
    The latter can be a problem if you forget they're there, so against a wall makes it easier to keep track of them.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne & Wear Green Belt Posts: 1,506
    other
    Fairygirl said:
    Even small plants /seedlings of those two plants would never need to be undercover.
    I leave small [2 or 3 inch pots] examples outside all year round here. The most they'd get would be tucked against a wall, or in amongst other plants. 
    The latter can be a problem if you forget they're there, so against a wall makes it easier to keep track of them.

    I've left a verbena cutting (from last summer) outside against the french doors (north facing) and it's still growing :o
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,307
    Hardy plants like those would never be indoors in the first place. That would do them far more harm than putting them outside against the house wall for the duration of the winter. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,091
    I wouldn't expect to notice a difference if I hardened these kind of plants off or not
    @Fire I would put these plants straight in the ground. As long as the ground is not frozen or waterlogged. Perennials like foxgloves grow all year round and prefer to be in the ground rather than a pot or Greenhouse.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,091
    I wouldn't expect to notice a difference if I hardened these kind of plants off or not
    @Fire Foxgloves are biennial sorry, but yes would apply to perennials.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,060
    other
    The only exception [other than the ground] would be if you bought larger plants which had been grown undercover, but even then - a couple of days outside in reasonable conditions, and they'd be fine left out. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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