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  • Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 432
    edited 25 February
    Thank you @nick615, that's really interesting. We should be valuing worms as much as we value pollinators. We need them for our survival. 

    Perhaps we should be popping in several worms into larger plant pots, especially those growing fruit or vegs? That's if it's not harmful or cruel. I understand worms can control their population depending on space and food source. 
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,468
    edited 25 February
    They find their own way in here @Jenny_Aster
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • B3 said:
    They find their own way in here @Jenny_Aster
    This year I'm a growbag fanatic, and doubt Mr Wriggly will be able to squeeze through the porous membrane though. But I must admit I'd forgotten they wriggle though drainage holes in plant pots. 
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 
  • CanterburyBellsCanterburyBells East AngliaPosts: 7
    When I had a balcony with a few planters of herbs and flowers, I popped in a couple of worms that I found stranded on the pavement outside my flat! (I hoped they would improve the soil in the pots.) Perhaps they survived and thrived, and perhaps the birds I was feeding on the balcony somehow brought more (on their feet??), because I ended up with quite a few worms in the planters and even in my large bag of compost! Everything grew pretty well, even though I knew absolutely nothing about gardening, so maybe the worms helped :) 
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