Forum home Plants

Hydrangea Cuttings

SonnieBSonnieB ROMFORD, Essex Posts: 102
edited 21 February in Plants
Hi all.  I took some hydrangea cuttings late summer I think and kept them under a bench until it started to turn really cold, around November time.  I wasn't sure what to do with them as they didn't look like they were doing anything, so I put them in my plastic flyaway greenhouse and forgot about them.  I found them today and at least one looks like it is growing




I'm not sure what to do with them now.  Should I pot on the one that's growing or leave it.  Should I keep them in the greenhouse or bring them outside.  I have never grown anything successfully from cuttings so am quite chuffed.  I just don't want to kill it. 

Any advice will be great fully received. 

Posts

  • chickychicky SurreyPosts: 10,153
    You could tap them gently out of the pot and then pot up the ones that have made roots into their own 9cm pots.  I would keep them in the greenhouse this spring until you are sure the cold weather is over (normally May in the SouthEast).  Keep an eye on them as if they grow quickly they might need moving to the next size pot, before the weather is kind enough to put them outside. They should be fully hardy, but with baby plants it doesn’t hurt to give them some tlc at the beginning.

    From what I can make out on the photo, you have two that have succeeded- the one showing leaves and the one next to it showing a fat red bud.  Not sure about the other two, but you may be lucky.

    its all very exciting 😀😀😀
    The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page  - St Augustine
  • I did a light prune of a Sambucus Black Lace a month ago, and stuck a couple of pieces into the ground just to see if they would take. I had a look yesterday, and was surprised to see leaves on both of them. I'll just leave them to get on with it. Or not.
    Sunny Dundee
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 3,214
    I wouldn't do anything until you see a bit of root at the bottom of the pot. I have a long history of killing off cuttings by taking them out too soon. The temptation is overwhelming! Just let them get on with it for a bit longer, then do what @chicky said.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,245
    Nicely done @SonnieB. Sometimes forgetting about them is the best method  ;)
    Just do as the others have said. 
    The other two look as if they have little sprouts of future foliage appearing as well, so you might have all three taking nicely.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Quite a few shrub cuttings will make first growth from the stored supplies in the stem. This makes the first buds make us think the cutting has taken. However, it takes much longer to produce a root system strong enough to support the cutting so I would not touch your cuttings for another few months. Keep the cuttings watered and sheltered until April/ May, they could then be moved outdoors for the rest of the summer. I would wait to pot on your cuttings until next Spring, just to make sure.
  • SonnieBSonnieB ROMFORD, Essex Posts: 102
    Thank you all so much for your comments and advice.  I will keep an eye on them and pot on later if necessary.  Yes, it appears 2 are viable I think.  How can a plant  still grow without water or adequate light or any type of care.  Nature is amazing.  Free hydrangeas would be awesome, they are not cheap. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,245
    They extract enough moisture from the air through autumn/winter @SonnieB ,and that's ideal for cuttings to just tick over and develop their roots etc.
    More damage is done by over watering and cossetting - especially with tough, hardy shrubs like Hydrangeas. Just keep checking the bottom of the pot, and once you have some roots showing, they'll be ready for a move.
    It can often look like they're ready when shoots appear, but that's quite normal. It's the root system that matters, and it cam take a while. Good luck with them    :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Quite a few shrub cuttings will make first growth from the stored supplies in the stem. This makes the first buds make us think the cutting has taken. However, it takes much longer to produce a root system strong enough to support the cutting so I would not touch your cuttings for another few months. Keep the cuttings watered and sheltered until April/ May, they could then be moved outdoors for the rest of the summer. I would wait to pot on your cuttings until next Spring, just to make sure.
    True, but i've never planted Willow cuttings, and i've read that they take easily from simply being stuck into the ground.
    I thought it i would give it a go with the Elder prunings. 
    Sunny Dundee
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 3,214
    Most willow are easy. Stick a stem in some water and you have roots in a couple of weeks. I don't know about elder.
Sign In or Register to comment.