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Planting scheme?

AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 264
Hello folks

With my apologies for the rudimentary drawing, I have this space in a newly-designed garden:



At the 'top' of the diagram is a patio which is overlooked, the whale-shaped blue is a cascade and pond. The 'bottom' of the diagram is lawn.

In order to screen the patio from particular windows, I've bought 3x calamagrostis and 3x molinea. Aside from that, I've bought 1x dryopteris (which I had in mind for next to, and overhanging, the cascade), 1x rodgersia, 3x rudbeckia little goldstar, 2x allium purple sensation. My questions are, if you'd be so kind:

1. Can the calamagrostis and molinea be interplanted or am I better off planting them, say, with the calamagrostis on the 4.5m length and molinea on the 2.5m length?

2. Between rudbeckia, verbena and allium, which would you recommend for planting with each of the grasses, or could I, say, plant allium with either grass? If so, I'd be inclined to put verbena in amongst all the grasses to give some continuity between the two beds (the black circle which separates them is the pond filter).

3. Where would you place the rodgersia and the dryopteris to look good with the grasses? I was going to plant both near the top of the 'whale's tail', one on either side to frame the cascade with greenery. What do you think?

Thanks for any help. This is really my first garden!

A.
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Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,211
    Photos would be really helpful.

    Rodgersia likes moist soil, so should be near water.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 264
    Here we are:



    The pond filter currently has a rock cover over it, 'though that may go as I think it makes more of an eyesore of it than without.
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,434
    That's going to look great! Your drawing didn't do it justice😏
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,114
    As far as your grasses are concerned it would be best if you could give the full names as molinias in particular are various sizes. You could look on the Knoll gdns web site for photos on how to use grasses and info on planting distance is also give. C Karl Foerester has a lovely upright habit and will stand all winter. Molinias will like more moisture than calamagrostis. Most grasses are cut back early march, only split when they are actively growing and into not too small pieces or they will struggle. 
  • AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 264
    Thank you.

    The molinia is Windspiel.

    As the greatest need for the screening is in a line between the furniture and the sedges, I'll probably put the calamagrostis there if it's more reliably upright and then put the molinia in the smaller 2.5m gap where it isn't such an acute need for screening from next door. There is plenty of moisture because that bed gets the run off from the patio.

    @B3, thank you. It was my project for pretty much all last year. It's getting to be quite different from what I inherited when we bought the house...




  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,114
    Wow you have worked hard. Lovely to see before and after photos. Both of your grasses are deciduous. There will be little to see after they are cut down in early spring. During summer they will flower and look good .Both forms have good autumn colour then in the winter they will be a biscuit colour. Molinia stems and flowers will snap and break late autumn with the wind. I grow C. Overdam and C Karl Foerster both are still standing well now in my garden. As for placing your grasses in a long border I would plant singularly along a border to tie it together[be careful not to plant in a straight line] You can also plant in groups of 3 per metre squared. Hope you get all of this I just think and type!
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,114
    Rudbeckia needs a moist soil but all verbenas hate wet feet.
  • AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 264
    Wow you have worked hard. Lovely to see before and after photos. Both of your grasses are deciduous. There will be little to see after they are cut down in early spring. During summer they will flower and look good .Both forms have good autumn colour then in the winter they will be a biscuit colour. Molinia stems and flowers will snap and break late autumn with the wind. I grow C. Overdam and C Karl Foerster both are still standing well now in my garden. As for placing your grasses in a long border I would plant singularly along a border to tie it together[be careful not to plant in a straight line] You can also plant in groups of 3 per metre squared. Hope you get all of this I just think and type!
    Thanks for your post. Just to check, by plant singularly, do you mean you'd plant the calamagrostis together and then molinia together separately? I think that's what my preference is at the moment, with verbena and rudbeckia intermingled.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,114
    I think I would plant the 3 Calamagrostis together in a group, that way next winter you will have all of them still standing tall. The molinia will have a clump of green at the base and from here the flowers will grow upwards and give the height, it has a different way of growing. There is no rule as to how you plant these grasses. I grow one M Transparent on it's own .Grasses planted singularly in a long border look lovely as they can hold the scheme together. Personally I would not plant both grasses together a contrast of leaf from other plants will look better.

    Alliums if soil is wet I would put a layer of grit in the planting hole.

    Rogersia you will need to water this if conditions are dry

    Rudbeckia will be fine in a retentive soil.

    Dryoptreis is not a plant you I would normally grow with grasses they have very different natural growing conditions but I understand why you have bought this.

    Verbena bonariensis? like all verbenas need good drainage if they are happy you will have lots of seedlings, plant with some grit.
    Gardening is a matter of trial and error everyone gets stuff wrong and other things make you happy .You have a mix of plants which will tell you all you need to know about the environment and soil they are growing in. Don't plant into soil that is frozen or waterlogged.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,114
    Forgot to say you could use verbenas as you say throughout and maybe add something to you taste to cover the allium leaves as they go yellow as the flower develops. Rudbeckia flowers late in the season. Yellow and purple will work well.
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