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Newbie gardener here

The top picture is an idea i like and the bottom 2 are of my garden i have to work with. Im looking for plants with some height for added privacy as well as some nice flowers and shrubs. I like different colours and heights but want to keep it so everything marries in together. Im just abit unsure as to what plants to go out and buy with what will last and flower and different times of the year ect. If anyone can give me advice on a good selection of plants to fill out my garden id appreciate it. Thanks


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  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 33,849
    Good morning Jordan. First of all I think you have to decide how much of your lawn you are prepared to sacrifice to create the borders wide anough to accommodate your planting scheme. Large plants will need wide borders. It would also help if you knew what type of soil you have i.e. is it acid or alkaline, as this can dictate the choice of some plants which are specific about what soil type they need. Soil testing kits are available but an easier way might be to just have a look around your neighbourhood to see what plants are growing happily. Finally the orientation of the garden e.g. south facing. Once you have established these basics then you can start to look for the sort of plants to get. You can refer to the internet, RHS website or here of course to find advice about plants suitable for light, shade, etc. and you can get the final heights and widths of the plants on the RHS pages, including approximately how long it will take for them to grow to full size.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,187
    As @Ladybird4 says, if you can establish those facts, that's the starting point. 
    You don't have the advantage of that 'borrowed landscape' in your first pic, so you may want a hedge rather than individual shrubs or trees. Bear in mind that anything of height along boundaries casts more shade, and also soaks up more moisture, and that will affect any planting in front of it. A fence often creates a rain shadow too, which then affects the amount of moisture getting in to plants, and that's where the aspect becomes more important, along with your general climate.  :)
    Our ground here is saturated, while some people in the SE of England have had hardly any rain for weeks or months. Getting the ground in good shape before you plant anything, is therefore very important. 

    It can be quite complicated starting with blank canvases, especially when you have houses nearby. Having a lot of tall planting along boundaries isn't always the answer. It's often easier to have a few shrubs/trees with lighter canopies at suitable points to counteract it and give you privacy, without creating dense shade. An easier way is to create privacy around your seating/dining area with a pergola or a simple screen, and a few climbers, especially as the space isn't very big.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Some progress was made. Couple more smaller flowerbeds around lawn just to do 😄 thanks 

  • UffUff SW Scotland but born in DerbyshirePosts: 1,701
    You've made a good start and are no doubt looking forward to the next stage of creating a garden. Will you keep us informed as it's nice to share gardens, especially new ones?
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 18,440
    In your photo with the cute dog in the middle it looks as though you are quite overlooked. You could plants some small trees such as crab apple, rowan, amelanchier, slim flowering cherry (lots of different ones, some will be too big).

    I see you have made a start with climbers on the fence, I would have suggested that as you have a decent amount of fence to do something with.

    As for shrubs, spireas are easy but there are a lot of different sorts, some short, some taller. Some are green and some have golden leaves such as Gold Flame and Golden Princess. Exochorda "The Bride" is smothered in white flowers in May. Dwarf lilacs have sweet smelling flowers and don't get too big for a small garden. Philadelphus also smells lovely and grows tall and slim. You could try some evergreen shrubs which will give some interest in winter, such as euonymus. There are so many shrubs, it may be easiest to go to a garden centre, note down what you like the look of and look them up so see how big they get, what growing conditions they like etc.

    For some difference in shape and texture there are cordylines and phormiums and grasses, if you like them.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • Thankyou all! Yes im definitely looking for more privacy and filling out the garden more with plants. Im going to do a flower bed also at the top of the garden and do some climbing plants up the fence in that area. I like the idea of a few taller trees and thankyou for the suggestions. I have plenty now to look into and im excited for the summer months ahead spent in the garden.



  • Joyce GoldenlilyJoyce Goldenlily Posts: 1,351
    The top picture is an idea i like and the bottom 2 are of my garden i have to work with. Im looking for plants with some height for added privacy as well as some nice flowers and shrubs. I like different colours and heights but want to keep it so everything marries in together. Im just abit unsure as to what plants to go out and buy with what will last and flower and different times of the year ect. If anyone can give me advice on a good selection of plants to fill out my garden id appreciate it. Thanks


    Remember also, no plants you put in your garden stay the size they are when planted. They all grow taller, wider, denser. Check for the average size when full grown, on the label, allowing for the fact it will only be an average. Most plants if happy will exceed the average for the type, this means leaving suitable growth space around each plant.
    There may be a local bye law about limiting the height of trees etc. in your garden to avoid uneighbourly disputes. A lot of councils limit front garden plant heights on estates, not sure about back gardens.
    Also allow for access to paint fences etc.
    A canopy, arbor or sail awning might be an option for privacy as you are pretty overlooked.
    Beware any plant labeled vigorous. It means there is a fair chance it will overtake your garden before you realise what is happening and you will be forever cutting it back, down or digging it out.
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