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How much can I trim curry plant?

As per the title, how much and when can I trim it? It's at least 3ft across now and falling open and loose. 

thanks


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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    I don't grow this, although I think I had it decades ago, before I realised it didn't really suit my conditions.
    If I remember correctly, they can be a bit like lavender, and need a regular trim, rather than being cut hard back. It may not respond well to a hard prune @ObliqueGeek
    Someone else might be able to advise better though  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • As above. Treat it like lavender.
    If you want to reduce the spread cut out a few of the lower woody stems to the main stem. Trim the rest back, leaving some new buds on any stems. You can shorten the stems back by about 2/3rds. I have a Santolina which I treat in the same way. I have found Curry plants tend to be more straggly than lavender.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,436
    I have grown this, and according to my research it can be pruned quite hard, so that's what I did, and it worked for me! It took a while to come back but it did come back. 

    These aren't my pictures, but show what to do. If yours is extremely woody, with no hint of any little shoots from the base of the plant, I would perhaps tread more carefully. Also, take plenty of cuttings.






  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 1,187
    I cut mine back hard each spring and it always grow back in abundance! I tend to do half the plant and then leave it for a few weeks so that there are some leaves to use if we want to.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,480
    Fairygirl said:
    I don't grow this, although I think I had it decades ago, before I realised it didn't really suit my conditions.
    Same, but also it made me hungry every time I brushed past it which wasn't ideal :#

    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    I'd have had to crush it very firmly to get any smell @wild edges, but I have a very poor sense of smell.
    It's why I'm not guided by scent when planning a garden, whereas most people have that as a 'must have'  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Robert WestRobert West Posts: 133
    A few people here comparing it to a Lavendar but in my experience they are very different. I chop my curry plant back to about 4-6in every 3-4 years (back to hard woody stumps) and it has always grown back just fine. It will sprout from old wood unlive Lavendar. Does take a full season to properly recover though.
  • So 2 very different opinions on how to trim in back! Still not sure what to do. Might try trimming 2/3 this year and cutting right back next year. Will see how it goes. 


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze South NottsPosts: 1,081
    @Fairygirl I think the smell can vary. I always smell herbs before buying some are better than others.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    I'd go for that method @ObliqueGeek . That way - you can hedge your bets a little bit.  :)
    Smell just isn't very important to me  @GardenerSuze, and I never liked the smell of that curry plant anyway! Many herbs need better conditions than I can give them too, which makes it harder. The Mediterranean ones especially. They need enough heat to release the oils well, and I have to overwinter most of those under cover, or tip the pots sideways etc. Certainly can't leave them in the ground if I want to ensure their survival. 
    I go through phases of growing things like rosemary, but it doesn't last very well here year on year, so I have to sow seed. I'm too lazy to do that most of the time  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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