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Sickly looking laurel ....

As you can see this one looks quite poorly. I planted it back in March after the previous owners lorry took out the end one of the hedge. I dug a good hole backfilled with soil, bonemeal and gave it plenty of water, barked around it and laid stone to help prevent drying out in summer during very hot spells. What have I missed .. any ideas ?
I should add that it went really well initially and looked better than the existing hedge which is far from perfect imho
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  • this was meant to be in the plants section not potting shed .. maybe that’s why no responses ? 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286
    I have no idea what the problem may be, but usually when a plant in the ground shows yellowing of the leaves it's often a sign that some vital nutrients/minerals are missing. In which case sequestered iron with added magnesium would probably sort it out.
    However, the adjacent plants show no sign of a deficiency, so it's a bit of an enigma.

    My only other thought is that the stones you have put around it may be leaching something into the soil that is preventing the plant from getting the nutrients it needs.
    Or it may just be that the plant is settling in and will recover as Spring arrives...


    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,762
    Doesn't matter where you post @muckyhandsmike. Most people don't look at that. Probably people just haven't seen your post  :)
    I wonder if it's been too near the pavement footings, and hasn't got much nutrition and moisture there. 
    I'd take those rocks away - they won't be doing anything worthwhile. :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Ok thanks for your replies. I put the rocks there to keep moisture in the ground but, given the time of year, I’ll remove them now. I did dig a good hole and added compost & leafmould before topping with bark. I will give the sequestrated iron a go peter.
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,422
    Between the pavement, the gravel, the grass and the established laurel next to it, it could have been struggling for water. Often what we think is enough isn't even close in the summer.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,762
    I agree @JennyJ.
    Compost and leaf mould possibly wouldn't have been enough sustenance if the soil is/was a bit poor too. It may not hold water well enough.
    I have clay soil, so I can get away with planting shrubs near boundary edges next to pavements.  
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Ok thanks. I’ve removed the Cotswold stone. I will add more organic matter and water more in the drier times .. if it lasts that long 😁
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,762
    They're pretty indestructible unless they get shot hole or something, so hopefully it'll revive and recover over time.  Some of it doesn't look too bad - just a bit pale.
    A bit of seaweed might help, but I'd leave that until it starts to improve     :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286
    The Cotswold stone won't have helped.
    It is limestone and rain will dissolve it very slowly which will raise the pH of the soil below.
    But if it's only been there a while, I'm not sure that would be the cause

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Follow up ... good advice to take the rocks away. I did and added more bonemeal and it’s looking just great now - thanks for the replies !
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