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Cats!

I'm sure this has been discussed a thousand times, but here goes :)  My neighbours all have cats which they're happy to let crap and pee all over my garden and trash my plants.  The cretinous felines are very fond, in particular, of running through the garden at the base of the boundary wall and while there's a hedge planted there, there is space underneath and behind it.  Have any of you had success with planting that has made cats very, very unhappy?  The base of the wall is south facing, partly shaded (by the hedge) with neutral soil.  The hedge is formed of fastigiate elders so what I'd really like is something small (under 50cm) and evergreen.  Roll on the day when cats are legally classed as pets, not property, and owners can be held responsible!
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,382
    Forget plants. 
    The only thing that works for me is the water scarecrow, but it's no use over autumn/winter because they freeze, so it isn't completely fail safe. Everything else is a waste of time and money IMO though. 
    Because of the problem of freezing, I've recently tried one of the sonar products which another forum member highly recommended, and  which I thought was working until last night, when one walked straight towards it completely unfazed.   >:)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Tanty2Tanty2 Posts: 146
    Thanks - I did try both these but found the models I'd bought had screws which rusted so after changing the batteries the first time, the screws were basically mush and I had to ditch them.  Sigh.  I do have the Super Soaker which the cats hate, but it involves me running down the garden like a demented old bat and I'd much rather find another way to make the little feckers miserable
  • How about blackthorn whips, planted close together? Layer them, twist them, plait them together as soon as they're planted, I'm pretty sure they'll soon make a nice 'unwelcome' fence. You can always keep the blackthorn small by lots of clipping.  I've a plan to grow rambling roses on top of my fences to send cats an unwelcome message. 

    I love cats, but.... :#
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,382
    I'm afraid blackthorn doesn't keep them out here in any way shape or form  ;)
    You'd need it be at least ten feet high, completely surrounding the garden and then there's the problem of suckering...
    Not to mention the fact that they get over gates...

    I know what you mean @Tanty2 - and why should you have to spend every waking hour watching and waiting. I should have said I've bought umpteen of them because of them freezing before I could get to them, and they don't last particularly well anyway. I'm sick of the expense, which is why I tried the Voss sonic doodah when @Bee witched suggested it, because it had worked well for her.
    They must be a lot more persistent here  :|
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Tanty2Tanty2 Posts: 146
    Persistent, or just evil?  :)  If people want cats, I wish they'd get a house cat so they have to live with the stench and the damage.   So far I've thought of either a rambling rose for some thorny ground cover, or maybe prostrate lavender...
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,382
    I've posted photos many times of the 'Vietcong pit' arrangement I had on some raised beds -which they still crapped on. Nothing like that stops them here  :|
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Tanty2Tanty2 Posts: 146
    Nor here, sadly.  Suppose I could just wish for considerate neighbours?  That'd be just as effective...
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,382
    I suppose if the route is mainly along and through the base of the hedge, you could try a length of chicken wire to block it, and see if it helps. 
    My sister had a similar problem a while ago, when the neighbour behind her removed part of the leylandii hedge between them, leaving a very empty space which was accessed within days. She got one of the scarecrows, but I haven't asked her if it helped. I expect she's filled it in a bit anyway now, but I'll try and remember to ask her next time she's on the phone. 

    As a last resort - every time one leaves a deposit, you could squirt the neighbours instead....
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • seacrowsseacrows Posts: 165
    Our cat enjoys rolling in lavender, rosemary and coriander. He also climbs the rose bushes so he can chew the new green leaves. Luckily, he prefers to toilet inside, because I prefer to garden bare handed. He does keep all other cats out of the garden, but getting a cat (or a dog) is probably a bit of an extreme remedy.

    If I don't want him walking somewhere I put large cobblestones in the pathway, and after walking there once (just to show he can!) he avoids them. Plant pots with a rock weighing them down also work. Not terribly pretty though.
  • Tanty2 said:
    I'm sure this has been discussed a thousand times, but here goes :)  My neighbours all have cats which they're happy to let crap and pee all over my garden and trash my plants.  The cretinous felines are very fond, in particular, of running through the garden at the base of the boundary wall and while there's a hedge planted there, there is space underneath and behind it.  Have any of you had success with planting that has made cats very, very unhappy?  The base of the wall is south facing, partly shaded (by the hedge) with neutral soil.  The hedge is formed of fastigiate elders so what I'd really like is something small (under 50cm) and evergreen.  Roll on the day when cats are legally classed as pets, not property, and owners can be held responsible!

    If you try the forum Search function you'll literally find hours of interesting debate vis a vis Cats.
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