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Heuchera problem

I bought heucheras last year but 4 are peppered with holes. What is causing thus and what can i do ti prevent it continuing.No sign of slug trail or caterpillars 
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  • Tanty2Tanty2 Posts: 146
    Not sure if it's the same thing but my Heuchera got rust - it was because the soil was always damp underneath them, the spores get in the soil so I had to lift them all.  Are your plants somewhere where the air can get underneath them and stop the soil always being damp?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,229
    edited 12 January
    It's definitely more like rust. Some are more prone than others. 
    There isn't any remedy as far as I'm aware, but if you cut them back they'll produce more fresh foliage. 
    I should have said - there does look like some slug damage on them too, although it's usually vine weevil that's the worst problem with Heucheras.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DorcascentsDorcascents Posts: 115
    Tanty2, Thank you, They are planted at bottom of garden,beneath a tree, slightly shade.I thought it would be ok and they would brighten up that area.Thanks for your information.
    Fairygirl Thank you  fr you information also.I did wonder if it was vine weevil as i have had problems with them before. I did use nematode solution  before planting the heucheras, but maybe not enough.I have checked if the plants are loose at the root, but they are not which i have found in the past. I will cut the leaves back and see how they grow. I did notice a pigeon in that part of the garden. would these be part of the problem?Also re the vineweevil will i have to wait till spring to apply nematodes again?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,229
    edited 13 January
    I have plenty of pigeons [wood] visiting here, including the regular 'pet'  Dave, but they never touch heucheras. Too busy hoovering up everything else   ;)

    Nematodes can only be used when ground temps are warm enough, so you'd have to wait a few months for those. I don't find them any use - the weevils are active long before the ground's warm enough to apply them. 
    I should have said that the ground never dries out here, and some heucheras seem more prone - the bright green ones like Lime Marmalade are very prone. Cutting back and keeping a good air flow definitely helps. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DorcascentsDorcascents Posts: 115
    Fairygirl, Thank you. The one of mine that's affected is the Lime marmalade' sadly as it is a favorite. I will cut it back and see how it goes
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,229
    It's the only one I have that gets it.
    I actually lifted one and dumped it in an empty pot, thinking I'd attend to it at some point and maybe stick it in the front garden as ground cover. The only attention it got was from the rain. It looked better than the ones in the ground   :D
    I might try putting a bit in the pond shallows to see what happens.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • UffUff SW Scotland but born in DerbyshirePosts: 693
    I had that one Dorcascents and it started to go quite pathetic looking and then rotted away. It was a favourite of mine too. I didn't replace it.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,229
    I could send you some @Uff. Grows like a weed here  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,245
    edited 14 January
    That rust started on my Lime Marmalade, too, about 3 years ago.  It has now spread to several other cultivars (and some of those I grew from seed), mainly affecting the lighter coloured ones (or maybe it's just more noticeable on those?)  Let's hope it doesn't become something like Aquilegia Downy Mildew, which has killed all of my aquilegia cultivars over the last few years. :'(
    Cuttings taken from affected Heucheras develop well with no sign of disease, but when back in the ground for a year or so, Mr Spotty comes back.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,229
    Most of mine are darker varieties, although I have Alabama Sunrise [technically a Heucherella] which is fine. It's yellow/gold with dark red veining. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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