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Increase flowering on carolina reaper pepper?

Hello again, I'm just wondering why the flowers of my carolina reaper plant is not letting me polinate them and rather die or not fully opening up to allow me to polinate it. 

is my pot i use big enough? 

the light should be plenty and the heat inside the grow tent stays at 24C - 28C at all times, it might go down to 22C during night but not any lower then that as the temprature controller switch on the extra heat when it goes below 22C 

its not my first pepper plant, i have 2 other bird eye chilis that are thriving in the tent and 1 Tapas Pepper plant inside same tent, each plant have their own lamp of same output.

the plan is to combine these 3 chilis to 1 plant in the future so i don't want to carolina reaper to die now when all others are ready, its only the carolina reaper i'm waiting on to be ready to continue my project. 

Indoor grower due to our cold climate in Norway
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Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,491
    edited 11 January
    I grew several (5+?) Carolina Reapers a couple of years ago. They fruited prolifically without human intervention. 

    I treated them just the same as all the other chillies I was growing at the same time.  (10 Blue Christmas and 4 Cayenne) . 

    Sown indoors in March they were potted on and eventually they were in 8” pots of MPC.   They grew to around 3ft in height 

    In July, August and early Sept they were outside on the southeast-facing terrace 24/7 then they lived by the tall southeast facing windows in our studio. 

    Fed with tomato feed every couple of weeks and watered when the leaves showed signs of flagging.

     They’re not difficult. If you grow them alongside the variety you want them to hybridise with the insects will do the job for you. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I grew several (5+?) Carolina Reapers a couple of years ago. They fruited prolifically without human intervention. 

    I treated them just the same as all the other chillies I was growing at the same time.  (10 Blue Christmas and 4 Cayenne) . 

    Sown indoors in March they were potted on and eventually they were in 8” pots of MPC.   They grew to around 3ft in height 

    In July, August and early Sept they were outside on the southeast-facing terrace 24/7 then they lived by the tall southeast facing windows in our studio. 

    Fed with tomato feed every couple of weeks and watered when the leaves showed signs of flagging.

     They’re not difficult. If you grow them alongside the variety you want them to hybridise with the insects will do the job for you. 
    well im doing it indoors because putting them outside would be to cold, even in the summer, so no insects to help me here. So carolina reaper pepper does not need to be polinated like bird eye chili and tapas pepper plant needs to be? 
    Indoor grower due to our cold climate in Norway
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,491
    I've never done it ... but we have plenty of pollinating insects here ... where are you situated?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I've never done it ... but we have plenty of pollinating insects here ... where are you situated?
    Norway. its not like we dont have insects. but i grow indoors because i live very north in norway and even in summer the temp barely reaches 20C, right now its 14- outside so i doubt the chili will survive outside now
    Indoor grower due to our cold climate in Norway
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559
    I think your temperatures are very good.  22C at night is a good temperature for them.
    As you have no insects you could try hand pollinating to make sure the pollen gets to where it needs to be.
    In cool early summers here when insects are scarce, I use my electric toothbrush!
    Just turn it on and gently put the HANDLE against the main stem for a couple of seconds, the vibrations should shift the pollen.
    Alternatively If you have a very soft brush, gently put the bristles on the front of the flower and give the brush a twist to move the pollen about.

    If the flowers are dropping off before they form properly, your plants may be missing some nutrients. Do you feed them?
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,491
    I've never gardened in your climate ... but my instinct would be to get your chillies to the flowering stage at a time to coincide with your warmest temperatures, and at that time I'd put your chillies by open windows, on a verandah or somewhere sheltered and as warm as possible where pollinating insects can find them.  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Pete.8 said:
    I think your temperatures are very good.  22C at night is a good temperature for them.
    As you have no insects you could try hand pollinating to make sure the pollen gets to where it needs to be.
    In cool early summers here when insects are scarce, I use my electric toothbrush!
    Just turn it on and gently put the HANDLE against the main stem for a couple of seconds, the vibrations should shift the pollen.
    Alternatively If you have a very soft brush, gently put the bristles on the front of the flower and give the brush a twist to move the pollen about.

    If the flowers are dropping off before they form properly, your plants may be missing some nutrients. Do you feed them?
    I'm already doing this with a Q-tip brush, but the issue is the carolina reaper plant, if you look at the flower buds it doesnt fully develop any pollen, it stops before it develops pollens and eventually dries out and produce no pepper, you have helped me before with my other chilis in previous posts. look at the picture il show below, the flower doesnt fully mature and dies before i can pollinate it, it ends up like the flower on the bottom, so what am i doing wrong to this carolina reaper plant or is this just part of the process? because im doing exactly like im doing on all my other chili plants


    Indoor grower due to our cold climate in Norway
  • sinderyt151R93x17HKsinderyt151R93x17HK NorwayPosts: 99
    edited 11 January
    I've never gardened in your climate ... but my instinct would be to get your chillies to the flowering stage at a time to coincide with your warmest temperatures, and at that time I'd put your chillies by open windows, on a verandah or somewhere sheltered and as warm as possible where pollinating insects can find them.  
    My climate is indoors and artificial like it would be in the tropical wild, its why im using a tent to be able to produce high heat without spending alot of money on eletricy. 


    Indoor grower due to our cold climate in Norway
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559
    What about the feeding?

    I've been growing peppers and chili in my greenhouse for years.
    I do find that when flowers form early in the season they often turn yellow and drop off before they have formed properly, but after a couple of weeks they seem to be ok.

    Maybe it has something to so with the length of their 'day' that is under your control.
    Many plants perform differently depending on the length of their day, but I think peppers produce fruits all year round in their native habitat so I'd guess that 12-14 hours a day would be right

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Pete.8 said:
    What about the feeding?

    I've been growing peppers and chili in my greenhouse for years.
    I do find that when flowers form early in the season they often turn yellow and drop off before they have formed properly, but after a couple of weeks they seem to be ok.

    Maybe it has something to so with the length of their 'day' that is under your control.
    Many plants perform differently depending on the length of their day, but I think peppers produce fruits all year round in their native habitat so I'd guess that 12-14 hours a day would be right

    its been a month since i gave it fertilizer if thats what you mean with feeding, i have some special liquid i mix with water that is labeled " Chili fertilizer " you mean it could be the reason for the flower to not form properly even tho there is fertilize balls in the dirt that releases fertilizes all the time when it gets exposed to water.

    the lamps are on for 16 hours and off for 8 hours by a timer everyday at same time, at same time the tempratures will go down to 22C minium, if it goes below 22C the thermostats kicks in and add more heat so it doesnt drop below 22c
    Indoor grower due to our cold climate in Norway
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