Forum home Problem solving

Mildew or Infestation? Laurel??

Hello
Can anyone help me please?  I think this may be a Portuguese Laurel but not sure.  I have no idea what is on the leaves - can anyone identify both and advise how to deal with the problem?  Many thanks. 

Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,557
    edited 9 January
    I think it's an elaeagnus.
    The spots on the leaves may be scale insects - do they come off if you scrape the leaf with your fingernail?

    PS - I should have said the underside of the leaf (which is where they usually live)
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,404
    I agree - an Eleagnus.

    They also look a bit like the casings of aphids/whitefly. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,444
    Definitely Eleagnus - but I think that sort of silvery spotting on the young leaves is quite normal.  It almost looks like felt when the leaves first emerge - and gradually disappears as they age.
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • AcuwellAcuwell Posts: 66
    Thanks so far - looks like it is Eleaganus by majority vote!  BUT is it an infestation or the normal silvery spotting.  It looks quite ugly to me, not healthy at all?
  • floraliesfloralies Haute-Garonne SW FrancePosts: 1,808
    They look like scale insects to me, I get the same on my Euonymus, in fact I  noticed some on the leaves the other day. On Euonymus you can hard prune but others will advise on Eleagnus as I don't have one.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,404
    I know exactly what @Liriodendron means about way foliage first appears on Eleagnus, but it didn't look quite right for that to me. 
    Perhaps give it a month or two and see what happens @Acuwell. They're pretty indestructible, and you can certainly prune them back quite hard without any problem. I'd leave it for now though, unless it's mild where you are for the foreseeable.   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,557
    I had one ages ago and I recall the soft down on new leaves, but I'm not sure that's what it is.
    There's a couple of pics on this thread showing the down and another with scale insects.
    https://www.gardening-forums.com/threads/elaeagnus-silverberry-disease.21454/

    They are very tough shrubs, so prune it if you like and as much as you like.
    They grow back quickly in the spring.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,404
    I have one [not that I look at it much - it's just a windbreak at the side path ] but it doesn't look like that when it has new foliage. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,444
    That's a useful link, @Pete.8.  I'm now sure that those of you who diagnosed scale insects are right... sorry.  The good news is that a hard prune once the weather warms up a bit will hopefully get rid of the infestation, and rejuvenate the shrub.   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
Sign In or Register to comment.