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Brown spots on my camellia

tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 198
Hi

I bought 2 camellia from a nursery 6 months ago.

Theyve started getting brown spots on. (one more so than the other).

Should I pick the infected leaves off maybe?




This is them in situ. If its fungal should I move the plants further away from each other?


Also, slightly off topic...



I have this small acer/maple. Everytime I leave it outside the leaves seem to die. So its been in my garage all summer and it seems to like it in side. (you dont get 'indoor acers' do you?).

Now the leaves are dropping off, should I continue to water it, or wait until spring.

Thanks


Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,166
    Re the camellias  - I wouldn't worry too much just now. They often get bits and pieces of damage, although there are a few pests that can cause the odd problem. Here's a link to the RHS site which might help to ID anything causing problems
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/disease/camellia-leaf-blight
    On the whole they're fairly trouble free, but they aren't great in pots unless they have all the right care re soil and watering.
    I certainly wouldn't leave the Acer inside a garage. I'm surprised it even had foliage until recently, but that's probably because it's been undercover.
    It's a dissectum of some kind, which means it's a bit more susceptible to wind and sun damage than the tougher palmatums.
    It needs a semi shaded spot out of wind and sun, with enough moisture to keep it happy, although it's unlikely to need any just now, unless you never get any rain? I don't have to water anything from October onwards here, but anything potted needs checked if you're in very dry area. 
    Morning sun after frosts can cause a fair bit of damage too, so a west to north west facing site is often the best.

    That goes for the camellias too - morning sun after frost wreaks havoc on new buds and emerging flowers, so the same kind of site is best for them.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 198
    Ref Magnolia: Indeed, everytime I took it outside, the slightest bit of sun scorched it and a breeze made its leaves curl. So I left it in the garage and it seemed to like it!   :D

    Perhaps I shall try putting it in the storm porch. Although, perhaps best to leave it in the garage for now if its only going to get frosty?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,166
    Frost doesn't affect either of those shrubs as such - they're both very, very hardy, and it's only new growth or buds [ on the Camellia] that get hit if they're in morning sun after a frost, hence dappled shade being the best location for both. They wouldn't grow in such profusion in Scotland if they couldn't cope with cold weather  ;)
    Garages are no use for Acers - sorry. Your porch might be better for a spell if it's been cossetted though, but even winter sun can fry plants, so if it comes into leaf early [which it might due to the protection]  that's no use either. You would be compounding the problems.
    If it was mine, I'd get it acclimatised again - out during the day and in overnight for a few days, and then leave it in a suitable position where it won't get wind and strong sun, but will get enough moisture. If it's frosty rather than damp, just wait until it's damp again. My potted ones always get moved against the shed, or among other shrubs,  or to the front of the house -  all north or north west facing sites and sheltered from morning sun and the worst of the wind. In previous gardens I did the same. If they're planted in the ground, I pick a suitable site as described. 

    I'm a bit confused now - the photos are Camellias not Magnolias. Is there a Magnolia as well?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 198
    Thanks for the detailed reply @Fairygirl . I will do as you say.

    (Also, sorry, I meant Acer not magnolia! :D )

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,166
    I was starting to think I was losing the plot @tuffnelljohn - which isn't unusual  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,882
    I think Dartmoor has a climate and atmosphere of its own,  I find plants that will grow for me and chuck the rest. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 198
    Lyn said:
    I think Dartmoor has a climate and atmosphere of its own,  I find plants that will grow for me and chuck the rest. 

    Cheerss Lyn. Im starting to discover that for myself!  :D
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