Forum home Plants

Help identifying ?viburnum

There are a couple of evergreen shrubs growing near my house with beautiful little pink-and-white flowers, and I’d love to get one for my own garden, but I’m not sure exactly what they are! I think it’s a Viburnum Tinus but I can’t seem to find a variety with such bright pink flowers - only pink buds. Any ideas, please?


«1

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    V. Eve Price possibly   :)
    The flower colour can vary a bit [as with any plant] but it has pink flowers, fading to white.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,563
    something has been munching on the leaves. Vine weevil or Viburnum beetle perhaps.
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    Unfortunately, vine weevil do like them @Hostafan1  :/

    The beetles are awful if you get them. I'm lucky that I haven't, although my sister had an infestation. 
    On her Viburnum...not herself.... :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,563
    Fairygirl said:
    Unfortunately, vine weevil do like them @Hostafan1  :/

    The beetles are awful if you get them. I'm lucky that I haven't, although my sister had an infestation. 
    On her Viburnum...not herself.... :D
    We have to be grateful for such mercies

    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    Hostafan1 said:
    Fairygirl said:
    Unfortunately, vine weevil do like them @Hostafan1  :/

    The beetles are awful if you get them. I'm lucky that I haven't, although my sister had an infestation. 
    On her Viburnum...not herself.... :D
    We have to be grateful for such mercies

    Quite  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,665
    edited December 2021
    Viburnum tinus Gwenllian is another. see pic 1 and 2.
    Recently found a new one in garden centre. V. tinus Lisarose... pics see below.

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/302763/viburnum-tinus-lisarose-(pbr)/details




    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Thanks everyone. @Silver surfer I like the look of the Lisarose flowers, I’ve never seen that one before. 
    Are vine weevil/ beetle difficult to get rid of (on plants or people 😁)? These are in an amenity planting so I don’t think they are regularly cared for; does that make a difference? 
    Are there any alternatives for a bit of winter interest, without the risk of introducing pests? This is our second winter in this house and the garden is so barren at this time of year! We have a lot of shade in winter but full sun in summer, so looking for something that could cope with both. Oh, and also damp clayey soil. Not a lot to ask! 
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 3,196
    Almost everything has some sort of pest, I'm afraid. Winter flowering shrubs are a real bonus and they often have scent, too. Viburnum offers a number of types but there is also mahonia, winter honeysuckle, wintersweet, some willows that can be kept small and witch hazel, all of which are happy on clay. Dogwoods have wonderfully coloured stems, especially when viewed in sunlight.
    If I were you, I would pop in to a good garden centre from time to time because they tend to stock plants at their time of interest, so you get a good idea of what you are getting.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    If you give us a few pointers as to what you want -  other planting around, single specimen or whole border planting, nearby fences/walls/buildings etc @keysnatcher, we can offer suggestions. 

    @Posy has given you some to start off with, and I'll add Ilex [holly] to the list, as well as variegated shrubs like Eleagnus, which are a good foil to other plants during spring and summer   :)

    Vine weevils are pretty common in lots of gardens, but for something like Viburnum, it's generally an aesthetic problem. An otherwise healthy plant will shrug them off. Mine [I have V. burkwoodii]  hasn't had any problem, despite the fact I have vine weevil in the garden.  The grubs are the main problem as they eat the roots of plants, and you don't always realise until they just keel over. The V. beetle destroys the leaves, leaving them like lace, but the worst thing about them is the smell. It's possible to get shrubs back to normal though - they're fine if pruned back hard.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks @Fairygirl
    It’s possible I already have vine weevils and haven’t noticed - I never know what’s eating my plants!

    I’m looking to introduce new planting beds around the lawn, starting with this corner that’s up against a leylandii hedge (kept to about 2m high). This is the southern boundary so the hedge shades that corner through from about early October to perhaps April, and after that it’s partly in the sun almost all day. I’m looking for something big enough to make an impact against the hedge (I know lee-of-hedge planting can be tricky, but it’s generally quite damp there and the grass grows right up to the hedge, so I’m hopeful something will grow there!). I’m a bit wary of Ilex to be honest, as my parents have a giant one in their garden and as a child I was always stepping on spiny leaves! I’ll
    look up the Eleagnus you suggested, though - I’ve never come across one. Thanks for all your great suggestions!  

     
Sign In or Register to comment.