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Lemon tree drying

Hi everyone I have lemon tree but it seems that one of the leaves is drying and curling they are in a little green house with humidity. Can someone help me. Thank you
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  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,380
    edited December 2021
    I see from your earlier posts that you are in Canada  :)
    https://forum.gardenersworld.com/discussion/1058455/baby-lemon-tree#latest

    Is your little plant still inside the house, or is the little greenhouse you're using indoors ?
    I'm no expert but the soil looks extremely dry, l'm hoping someone with more citrus growing experience can help, fingers crossed. 
    Edited to add maybe @Nanny Beach can help, but it being Christmas time, she may be a bit busy at the moment  :)
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,045
    Through autumn and winter citrus plants need to be kept in a well lit space, frost free and well fed with specialist citrus feed which is high in P, K, magnesium and other trace elements needed for flowering and fruiting.   They need to be watered but not drowned.

    Come spring they can go outside, once nights are warm enough with no more frosts, in a sunny, south facing position and then you need to switch to a high N feed for foliage to keep their leaves healthy. 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • AnniD said:
    I see from your earlier posts that you are in Canada  :)
    https://forum.gardenersworld.com/discussion/1058455/baby-lemon-tree#latest

    Is your little plant still inside the house, or is the little greenhouse you're using indoors ?
    I'm no expert but the soil looks extremely dry, l'm hoping someone with more citrus growing experience can help, fingers crossed. 
    Edited to add maybe @Nanny Beach can help, but it being Christmas time, she may be a bit busy at the moment  :)
    Thank you my citrus still inside the house in a little green house with a lot of humidity I put a lot of mulch over the soil so I don’t need to water them a lot. 
  • Obelixx said:
    Through autumn and winter citrus plants need to be kept in a well lit space, frost free and well fed with specialist citrus feed which is high in P, K, magnesium and other trace elements needed for flowering and fruiting.   They need to be watered but not drowned.

    Come spring they can go outside, once nights are warm enough with no more frosts, in a sunny, south facing position and then you need to switch to a high N feed for foliage to keep their leaves healthy. 
    That’s good right it contains magnesium 
  • I close the green house and I put the humidifier so it stay humid inside you can see in the first picture that the leaves is turning white and dry. 
  • Hi everyone I have lemon tree but it seems that one of the leaves is drying and curling they are in a little green house with humidity. Can someone help me. Thank you

  • In my opinion, the problem is with the roots. Pot too big. You need to pull out, check the roots, plant in a small pot, water a little
  • In my opinion, the problem is with the roots. Pot too big. You need to pull out, check the roots, plant in a small pot, water a little
    I changed the pot in fall because the root were too big so I don’t think it’s that. The other citrus is doing just fine. But thanks I’ll look if there’s root rot. 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,045
    Humidifiers are fine for foliage but not much help for thirsty roots.  Mulch will also lock in dryness.

    I suggest you dunk each pot in a bucket of water till no further air bubbles appear then let them drain completely before you put them back in their home.  Do this every time you water and you will know they have enough water but not too much and not too little.  Poking a finger down into the compost as far as your first knuckle will tell you if the compost is dry and they need watering again.

    I keep all my citrus plants in the polytunnel over winter and water using a hosepipe - they are in 60cm pots now.  They have good drainage at the bottom of their pots and are standing on the soil so are never too damp but are protected from cold winter winds and frosts.   Every now and a gain I spray the leaves with the hosepipe to remove any dust so they can function at maximum capacity, even in low winter light.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 7,881
    Yes everything that Obelixx said,I wouldn't put a citrus this small in a polytunnel. I don't know what temperatures you get or Obelixx. In the Beast from the East,we had -12 at night completely unheard of here. The lemons and grapefruit were in a small lean to green house, with a tubular heater,and bubble wrap. They all lost their leaves. The mandarin and calamondins are much more tender and live in the conservatory between November and march, when they will start going outside in the days.
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