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Quck q on mulching over emerging shoots

borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 283
Good morning!  I'm mulching some if my borders with well-rotted manure. Where I have shoots emerging from spring bulbs, should I mulch around them or is it OK to cover them?
Example in the pic below.. snowdrops I think. I also have early daff shoots emerging.
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  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 283
    .. i should have added, also same question for the crowns of dormant perennials like Echinacea?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,223
    I wouldn't worry about covering bulbs - perfectly ok for those, but I don't mulch over perennials here. It's wet enough without adding to the problem  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    Always a tricky one, which is one reason why it's recommended to do this in the autumn, before spring bulb shoots appear.  However, I more often than not leave it late and do it at this time of year as long as the ground isn't frozen, but I do make sure there are no big lumps in the manure.  I would use something drier and looser to protect the crowns of perennials, for the reasons @Fairygirl mentioned. :)
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 283
    Thanks @Fairygirl and @BobTheGardener. I'll mulch over the bulbs and around the bigger shoots, and be careful not to cover the crowns of perennials.  

    For more tender perennials (like salvias and dahlias) am I right to think I'm better off giving them a deep covering anyway to protect against frost?  I'm taking a chance with dahlias, I've put some in the frost-free greenhouse and left a few outside in the ground to see how they fare. It's usually pretty mild down here.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,223
    I can't comment on those - they'd need overwintered indoors here. The only salvia I have is caradonna, which is completely hardy everywhere. It just gets left to it's own devices. 
    I expect a layer of mulch might suffice with the dahlias - many people in mild areas leave them in situ.  :)

    I leave stems on perennials, so there's always a bit of 'stuff' there, and that means it's easy to avoid them if I put down any mulch. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 3,212
    If they are snowdrops, I would put the mulch round rather than over them but it will depend on the depth of mulch. A sprinkling is ok, four inched is too much, in my experience.
  • Lena_vs_DeerLena_vs_Deer Seattle WA, USAPosts: 200
    I agree about sprinkling.
    We mulch our snowdrops, but more like a dressing - mulching all plants near them as suppose to normally , and then just gently brush some of the mulch from the edges towards snowdrops to make border look even . 
  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 283
    Thanks everyone 
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,449
    Fairygirl said:

    I leave stems on perennials, so there's always a bit of 'stuff' there, and that means it's easy to avoid them if I put down any mulch. 

    Ditto. I now leave all stems on my perennials until the end of Winter, to the dismay of my OH who doesn't like the "untidy" look. ;)
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,223
    Well -it's only me who needs to have an opinion @Papi Jo, so I don't have to worry  :D
    Very visible ones [from the kitchen window] might get a bigger haircut though  ;)

    I can honestly say - I've never used four inches of mulch at any time, or anywhere. That depth might be a problem, but a couple of inches [which is probably what most people will do] certainly won't bother bulbs.
    I probably mulch a couple of times a year, although mainly in autumn/winter, when there are gaps from perennials that have died back. I have a lot of ground covering planting because of 'unwanted visitors' using the garden as a toilet, and that means less mulching in those borders. 
    The other area that gets more regular layers put on it is the foot of the hedging. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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