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Waterfall

AstraeusAstraeus SheffieldPosts: 313
Evening folks,

We've just finished building a 3x2m pond in the back garden and I am currently working on the cascade (see picture below - sorry, it wouldn't allow me to rotate it!).  Two questions please:

1. What stones should I use to make this look natural?  I am thinking of putting two large feature rocks either side of the plastic waterfall and then just using small rocks - similar in size to those already in situ - to edge the small header pond and then filling in with a variety of cobbles and pebbles.  But I don't really know what rocks I should be looking for.  Would ordinary rockery rocks do (that's what I've thrown in as per the picture) or is there a specific type of rock/boulder that I ought to be using?  Do you think flatter or more rounded would look more natural, or a mixture of both?  I've spent ages staring at streams in the wild to see what they look like but I'm really getting myself in a tizz about stone selection!

2. I'd like to plant up the sides of the cascade.  What plants would be recommended?  I don't want anything massive (so ruling out royal fern, for instance) but I figure ferns are likely to look the most natural at a streamside?  Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

A.

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,175

    There you go 😊 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,861
    Just a tip - avoid any type of limestone rock as it will alter the pH of your pond water.

    I built a waterfall 30+ years ago and used slate - still looking good today, but lots of ivy has taken up residence!
    I made a little w/l pond further down the garden and I used Yorkstone in and around that.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,305
    I'd suggest keep to just one type of stone to make it look more natural
    Devon.
  • AstraeusAstraeus SheffieldPosts: 313
    Thanks @Pete.8 - and just any old Yorkstone?  You weren't too fussed about finding round pieces, big pieces or avoiding ones that looked fairly flat?  I know I'm overthinking it as nature doesn't care what stones it throws down a stream, but I'm so happy with the rest of the project that I'd hate to fall at the last!
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,305
    edited December 2021
    Astraeus said:
    Thanks @Pete.8 - and just any old Yorkstone?  You weren't too fussed about finding round pieces, big pieces or avoiding ones that looked fairly flat?  I know I'm overthinking it as nature doesn't care what stones it throws down a stream, but I'm so happy with the rest of the project that I'd hate to fall at the last!
    Waterfalls tend to form over natural rock strata, not so much tumbled stone.
    Make the feature fit the rock, not poke the rock about to fit the stream

    Devon.
  • AstraeusAstraeus SheffieldPosts: 313
    Hostafan1 said:
    Astraeus said:
    Thanks @Pete.8 - and just any old Yorkstone?  You weren't too fussed about finding round pieces, big pieces or avoiding ones that looked fairly flat?  I know I'm overthinking it as nature doesn't care what stones it throws down a stream, but I'm so happy with the rest of the project that I'd hate to fall at the last!
    Waterfalls tend to form over natural rock strata, not so much tumbled stone.
    Make the feature fit the rock, not poke the rock about to fit the stream

    That's a really good point.  When I look at pictures of local streams - like these - there is a lot of flat-topped rock rather than tumbled or rounded stones.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,861
    edited December 2021
    There are several garden centres and pond supply outlets around here and most of them sell pond-safe rocks and boulders.
    I think there are about 5-6 types incl. Yorkstone and Granite - can't remember the others
    The slate was ideal for a waterfall as it's thin and comes in quite large pieces so I could make a few steps - quite pricey now thought I think.
    This is my little pond- most of the Yorkstone is smothered.


    This is the slate pond a few years ago


    This was taken just after I made it

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,850
    If the surroundings of your garden are hilly there may be exposed rock - and local buildings may be constructed of the same stone.  If so, using the same stone in your stream and waterfall could look more appropriate and harmonious than importing something different...  and you may find local garden centres sell it, or a local quarry.
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,019
    If you want it to look natural, you'll need to completely hide/disguise the source [ie the metal shelf]  as it's an obviously man made structure.
    That's as important as the type of rock and the placement of it. You can use evergreen planting for that  :)
    In nature, ferns are certainly the most common planting round/beside waterfalls, along with wild orchids etc,  but you can tailor that a bit so that it all drifts into the surrounds. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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