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Switching to plant-based alternatives

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 19,309
    I don’t eat eggs but I suppose I drink about a pint of milk in different forms once a week. In the simplest terms, I don’t eat anything that has a face or might have developed a face. I consider myself to be about 90% vegetarian.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • OmoriOmori North YorkshirePosts: 1,331
    That’s pescatarian (the fish eating ‘veggie’). 

    Oat milk is very healthy for you. 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 74,918
    pansyface said:
     I suppose it depends on how far you stretch out the idea of “healthy” as an option. Healthy for whom? For what? Healthy for people or healthy for animals or healthy for the planet?

    If cows are raised for milk, they have to be produce a calf to get that milk turned on. That calf is then either another dairy cow or a beef animal. Either way, it has to be fed on something, as do its parents. When I was a child, the farmer kept his cows out in the fields eating grass for a good amount of time. They gave birth in the fields and kept their calves at their feet. Now, in many places, cows live indoors and eat artificially produced food. They are nothing more than meat and milk factories.

    Each person must decide for themselves whether what they eat can be justified as “healthy”, for whatever that is, be it themselves, the animals in question or the planet.


    The vast majority of dairy and beef production in the UK is still traditionally pasture-based and there's a  increasing number of suckler herds where the calves run alongside their mothers. 

    It's the beef and dairy in the US and Brazil etc that is carried out in confined 'lots' or inside buildings as you describe.
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 19,309
    It's complex ... the decline in starlings and some other birds, as well as small mammals in the East of England has been linked to the loss of grazing pastures which have been turned over to arable cropping ... 

    In order for their to be arable land, did the farmers grub up miles of hedges? I grew up on the outskirts of Sheffield. You couldn’t imagine a filthier city. But there were hedges all around where we lived. We had skylarks, starlings by the thousand. Then the hedges went. I don’t know if the farmers got paid to grub them up. You never hear a skylark or see a starling round there now.

    Good to see that Scotland has a Dutch “rewilding” benefactor at least. It was on Radio 4 this morning, I think.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 12,197
    No, I don't consider vegan to be inherently healthier. I have lived with far too, many 'pizza and chips' vegans who eat out of packets. I could quite happily live on Coke and Hobnobs, convincing myself I was being low impact. [Cue the Coke bashing].

    On the subject of alt milks, I hear tell of UK grown potato milk coming along which tastes great and ticks lots of boxes. In Canada there is a wonderful soya milk (they don't sell it here). I never tasted anything as good in the UK and can't get on well with oat milks.

    I have a terrible history of oestopororis in my family and keep a keen eye on my calcium levels, which have usually been so low they are off the chart. This makes me wary to cut dairy (having been vegan for a while). I suspect dairy will now be the last thing for me to change - though I fully support the movement.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 19,309
    It's the beef and dairy in the US and Brazil etc that is carried out in confined 'lots' or inside buildings as you describe.

    I deliberately didn’t specify which countries. I was only interested in showing the effect on the planet. I don’t know how the cattle raising industries of the USA and Brazil compare in size to the British cattle raising industry, but I imagine it’s “lots”.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,170
    edited November 2021
    My grandparents and uncle ran a dairy farm, the cows spend the winter in barns fed on silage and cow nuts (which uses arable products including imported soya these days).
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,170
    edited November 2021
    pansyface said:
    It's the beef and dairy in the US and Brazil etc that is carried out in confined 'lots' or inside buildings as you describe.

    I deliberately didn’t specify which countries. I was only interested in showing the effect on the planet. I don’t know how the cattle raising industries of the USA and Brazil compare in size to the British cattle raising industry, but I imagine it’s “lots”.
    From the same article, we can see Europe's dairy industry is relatively low impact (in terms of CO2 at least). Still much higher than plant based milk of course - you're adding an extra animal into the food chain.


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 74,918
    @pansyface .... back in the 40/ 50/60s farmers were paid to grub up hedges ... it was in order to increase national food production desperately needed as a result of the two wars.  

    For many years now farmers have been encouraged to farm in a more sustainable way and to repair the damage done in former years.  This is just a small extract from the website of a farm I know well ...

    "... In an effort to reduce our Carbon Footprint, widen the range of crops grown and to produce renewable energy. In 2008.......... (we) became shareholders in Agri-Gen, an anaerobic digester which produces 4MW of electricity. This energy is used to provide power to the Onion and Potato stores while the digestate residue from the A.D process is returned to the land to enhance the nutrient content and organic matter.
     
    Around 90 acres of Willow Trees have been planted on low lying marshlands, providing vital habitats for wildlife, while producing quality Wood for Cricket Bats over a period of two decades. The Willows are replaced as they are harvested with whips from the Willow Tree Nursery also on the farm. We also intentionally sow wild flower seeds around field boundaries to encourage wildlife and provide habitats for native species..."

    There are also vast acreages being 're-wilded over Suffolk and Norfolk, from Ken Hill in Norfolk  (site of Springwatch and Autumnwatch this year)  ... just two of them are https://www.rewildingbritain.org.uk/rewilding-projects/wild-ken-hill
    Somerleyton on the Norfolk/Suffolk border https://www.privatesomerleyton.co.uk/rewilding/
    and also the vast 're-wilding' of the 5,000 acres 'Wilderness Reserve' in Suffolk by Jon Hunt.  

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 74,918
    Loxley said:
    My grandparents and uncle ran a dairy farm, the cows spend the winter in barns fed on silage and cow nuts (which uses arable products including imported soya these days).
    Lots more farmers have reverted to using silage and barley-meal nowadays, and locally grown legumes rather than imported soya nowadays.  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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