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Should I plant this Eryngium Alpinus horizontal or vertical?

DrumelzierDrumelzier SW ScotlandPosts: 25
Hi All!  I've just had 3 of these delivered. The only thing I have read is that they can be prone to crown rot. Should they be planted horizontally shallow, like iris rhizomes or deep vertically? Proud crown or submerged?  Thank you for any help. :smiley: 

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  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,498
    I've never heard of them getting crown rot.  I've found them to be tough as old boots, and the roots are quite thuggish.  

    You should plant it horizontally, with the crown at ground level, or slightly under.  In my experience, even when planted deeply, they still do well.  

    The most important thing is to get it into some soil straight away.  As it's nearly December, and frosts are quite regular (and the ground quite cold and hard), I would put it into a pot for the Winter, and ideally keep the pot somewhere sheltered (like an an unheated greenhouse).  Putting a bare root perennial into freezing cold ground now might shock the plant and kill it.  
  • DrumelzierDrumelzier SW ScotlandPosts: 25
    I've never heard of them getting crown rot.  I've found them to be tough as old boots, and the roots are quite thuggish.  

    You should plant it horizontally, with the crown at ground level, or slightly under.  In my experience, even when planted deeply, they still do well.  

    The most important thing is to get it into some soil straight away.  As it's nearly December, and frosts are quite regular (and the ground quite cold and hard), I would put it into a pot for the Winter, and ideally keep the pot somewhere sheltered (like an an unheated greenhouse).  Putting a bare root perennial into freezing cold ground now might shock the plant and kill it.  
    Thank you so much for this advice.  I hadn't really thought about how cold the ground is.  I have an unheated greenhouse, so we are good to go!  Would I water the pot?  And would I wait until warmer weather in the Spring before putting it out?  
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,498
    Yes @Drumelzier   Water the pot and keep it slightly moist over Winter.  You don’t want the root to dry out.  Plant in the ground next Spring once frosts are over.  They are big self seeders, be prepared to have lots of them!
  • DrumelzierDrumelzier SW ScotlandPosts: 25
    Yes @Drumelzier   Water the pot and keep it slightly moist over Winter.  You don’t want the root to dry out.  Plant in the ground next Spring once frosts are over.  They are big self seeders, be prepared to have lots of them!
    Excellent - thank you very much!
  • DrumelzierDrumelzier SW ScotlandPosts: 25
    Yes @Drumelzier   Water the pot and keep it slightly moist over Winter.  You don’t want the root to dry out.  Plant in the ground next Spring once frosts are over.  They are big self seeders, be prepared to have lots of them!
    Excellent - thank you very much!
    Sorry to be a bother again, but thinking on what you said re potting plants because it's so cold just now... I'm about to receive delivery of several Phlox paniculata and 2 roses... assuming these to be bare-rooted, would you recommend I do the same for them?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,327
    Any bare root plant can be heeled in somewhere in a spare bit of ground, if the weather suits, or just potted up.  :)
    If they're on the small side, it's always better to err on the side of caution and pot them. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DrumelzierDrumelzier SW ScotlandPosts: 25
    Fairygirl said:
    Any bare root plant can be heeled in somewhere in a spare bit of ground, if the weather suits, or just potted up.  :)
    If they're on the small side, it's always better to err on the side of caution and pot them. 
    Thank you - does "heeled in" just mean like a temporary outside position?  Sorry, but I'm still learning all the terminology!

    I see you are similarly located to me @Fairygirl - so your advice is worth taking extra notice...  :smiley:

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