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What is this low-growing woodland plant ?

EmerionEmerion Posts: 379
These pictures were taken 2 weeks ago in a local oak wood. I’m interested because we have some growing next to a hedgerow at home as well. It’s about a foot tall. 
Carmarthenshire 
If at first you don’t succeed, have some cake. 
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Posts

  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 264
    Have a look at butcher's broom, ruscus aculeatus. There seem to be some similarities but the leaves in your photos look more rounded and less evergreen.
    Not a plant I have seen much of, it's often recommended for deep shade but I've yet to see an attractive looking specimen, they often look half defoliated.
    Just an idea.

  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 264
    edited 22 November
    @Silversurfer may recognise it?
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,331
    edited 22 November
    Looks like Vaccinium myrtillus...it has several common names eg Bilberry, Whortleberry.
    Berries edible.

    It is very common up here. Hope this helps.
    In winter it loses the leaves...leaving just the twigs standing.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,331
    edited 22 November
    Woodgreen said:
    Have a look at butcher's broom, ruscus aculeatus. There seem to be some similarities but the leaves in your photos look more rounded and less evergreen.
    Not a plant I have seen much of, it's often recommended for deep shade but I've yet to see an attractive looking specimen, they often look half defoliated.
    Just an idea.

    There is a fabulous  very strong healthy specimen near here in Glendoick garden..I love it. Used to grow it but sadly found it impossibly slow.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 264
    Thanks @Silversurfer,  I thought you'd have a better idea than me on the photos but can't believe I didn't see it as bilberry! 
    That's a fine example of the ruscus. I think I've always seen it trying to grow where nothing else will, you know the sort of thing......it obviously thrives in the right place.
  • Woodgreen said:
    Have a look at butcher's broom, ruscus aculeatus. There seem to be some similarities but the leaves in your photos look more rounded and less evergreen.
    Not a plant I have seen much of, it's often recommended for deep shade but I've yet to see an attractive looking specimen, they often look half defoliated.
    Just an idea.

    There is a fabulous  very strong healthy specimen near here in Glendoick garden..I love it. Used to grow it but sadly found it impossibly slow.
    Glendoick has far too many tempting plants.
    I seem to end up there at least every couple of weeks.  :)
    Sunny Dundee
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,331
    edited 22 November

    Glendoick has far too many tempting plants.
    I seem to end up there at least every couple of weeks.  :)
    I really wish it was compulsory for this forum to show the area where someone lives!
    It is often relevant for temp /tenderness/ hardiness etc.
    I had no idea you lived just down the road from me!
    https://www.google.com/maps/@56.4613281,-3.0001677,14z
    You are really close to Glendoick.
    I trust you have been round the wonderful private woodland garden only open in the spring.

    My pics from there can be found below...

    https://www.flickr.com/search/?text=glendoick&[email protected]&album_search=1&view_all=1
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • @Silver surfer
    West End of Sunny Dundee.  :)
    Sunny Dundee
  • EmerionEmerion Posts: 379
    Thankyou @Silver surfer . We thought it looked like it might have borne berries, although there were none left. 
    Carmarthenshire 
    If at first you don’t succeed, have some cake. 
  • UffUff SW Scotland but born in DerbyshirePosts: 132
    edited 22 November
    If there is anyone living in this area there's nature reserve Kirkconnel Flow, near New Abbey south of Dumfries that is full of bilberries in late summer. Lovely woodland too.
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