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Peony. Has it earned the right to live?

B3B3 Posts: 21,494
About a month ago, I dug out a big old peony that  was annoying me and threw it in a concrete corner on the way to the council bin. A couple of weeks of flowers and months of boring leaves with a wide spread.
Anyway, it's got shoots growing. Should I have mercy and bung it in the ground somewhere or stick to my guns?
In London. Keen but lazy.
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  • CharlotteFCharlotteF East Surrey, UKPosts: 337
    Stick to your guns if you have better use for the space... I have similar mixed feelings about peonies. I have one that flowers very well, doesn't get too big and has healthy foliage. And another that is none of those things and is on borrowed time in my garden. I'll be doing the same as you if it doesn't buck up next year. 
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,627
    there must have been a very good reason why you dug it up.
    Offer it on freecycle rather than dumping it?
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,325
    If you don't like it -just chuck it. Or give it away. 
    I'd agree that many of them are short lived in terms of flowering, but that's why they need other planting round them to take over.
    I love the one I have in this garden, and it's mature enough that it flowers well, but the weather sometimes annihilates them just at the wrong moment  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Doghouse RileyDoghouse Riley South ManchesterPosts: 347
    edited October 2021
    We've had a peony for years in a side bed, if unsupported  part of it it flops onto the path which is annoying. So I chuck a foot-square piece of weldmesh over it in the spring and let it grow through it,  then once it's  grown a foot or so,  raise the weldmesh up on canes to support it.



    It's here in front of a fence post. It does no harm and flowers after the bluebells.



    I like to give plants a chance.

    if one doesn't do well I'll move it to a less prominent position. If it's something in a pot on the patio which  "becomes out of favour" with either me or more likely my wife, I move it to "the alley of shame." The drive along the side of our house where it's mostly out of sight and doesn't get a lot of sun.  Though there are two Mayleen clematis there, "that have not done any harm."

    There's a nice red rose. It's there because my wife thinks they reminds her of funerals. It's been there for several years, if it's a bit breezy "it waves at her through the side kitchen window."



    These plants can "see" the green bin from there, which is possibly the next stop, so they usually perk up a bit.

  • B3B3 Posts: 21,494
    It flowered (note past tense) well for a couple of weeks. I've decided that it's not enough for the space it takes up. 
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,627
    B3 said:
    It flowered (note past tense) well for a couple of weeks. I've decided that it's not enough for the space it takes up. 
    I refuse to carry passengers in the garden. If they don't pay their way, off they go.
    Devon.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,086
    Put it a bag and leave it on the pavement with a note and see if anyone might take it.
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,494
    I might try that. Only for one day in case people add to the pile.😐
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,325
    Or even worse- swap it for something like Japanese knotweed.... :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I have a resurrection area for those plants that don’t behave, or plants that I have located incorrectly so it’s my fault not theirs.  I give them a 50/50 grow or die option. I pop them in a pot, trim them back, feed and water them well, give them a good talking to, keep my green fingers crossed ……. and usually they see the error of their ways (or mine) and perk up.   Back in the correct border they go! 
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