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Planting in drifts

Hey all. My understanding of drift planting is it entails bunching the same plants together in organised but natural looking rows, also called 'drifts'. These drifts interconnect with other rows of plants. My question is should the different drifts all flow in the same rough direction or can they run perpendicular, and whatnot? Also, I'm just after some general tips on this style of planting. Of course there are no rules in gardening, but I'm interested to know how people successfully achieve the drift effect.
Thanks

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    Roughly the same direction is what makes the most sense   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,016
    The easiest way to plan your planting is to do a rough sketch on paper and colour it in with crayons.  That way you can do several designs/layouts with long drifts, short drifts, curved drifts, interlocking drifts.........
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • PigginPiggin Posts: 2
    Obelixx! Please get in touch with your email pals, they are all really worried about you! Pxx
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,904
    @Obelixx .... just nudging you in case you've not spotted the above message ... 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • Best of luck with it.

    I tried it in a small way with phlox on a rockery  a couple of years ago but gave up when it wasn't successful, due to different growth rates, times and possible mislabeling and let it get on with it


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,904
    When planting in drifts, don't forget to let the drifts 'bleed into each other' at the edges ... they'll look much more natural that way. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    Bear in mind that the heights of your plants will also vary according to your climate and conditions @mathewdavidbrown. That sometimes makes for a bit of frustration when you've planned, and planted,  a border! 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Obelixx said:
    The easiest way to plan your planting is to do a rough sketch on paper and colour it in with crayons.  That way you can do several designs/layouts with long drifts, short drifts, curved drifts, interlocking drifts.........

    The plan so far :-D


  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    Some lovely grammar there @poiuq5775...
    You can keep changing your name, but clearly - you can't change your behaviour   :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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