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Saxifrage

B3B3 Posts: 18,969
edited 14 October in Plants
Well I  think  that's  what they are.
Anyway, one trough  looks good and the other looks manky.  
Should  I  trim off the brown bits or poke them into the soil without cutting them off?
There's green above the brown  


In London. Keen but lazy.
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 40,587
    I don't really bother too much, but I pull out any larger areas of brown. Those are just bits that have died off - usually if they get too dry and aren't in good contact with the soil, or are shaded out.
    I sometimes just squish bits in to cover any small dead bits if I do pull them out. You can peg them down with bits of wire too - and they'll root quickly.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • B3B3 Posts: 18,969
    edited 14 October
    Thanks @Fairygirl. I think the unfortunate one was in the shade.
    I might add an inch of so of compost in lieu of squishing😊
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,904
    I’ve got a row of this,  it seems to live on top of rocks, in the summer it goes brown, I leave it, now it’s greening up again, it’s in the north garden so doesn’t get much sun at all. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • B3B3 Posts: 18,969
    Oooh @Lyn. Leave it. Now that idea really appeals😊
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,904
    I do,  I’ll take a phot tomorrow. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 40,587
    If they get plenty of rain they seem to be fine in most sites too. Not a problem with your site or mine @Lyn :)
    You could just pull bits off and plonk them in pots @B3.
    Mine seed everywhere. I had a lovely clump  between two white spireas, but they eventually crowded it out completely - understandably.
    All the bits along the back fence and the front garden [north to NW facing] do well. They don't seem fussy about aspect at all. I use them as a filler for bare ground. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • B3B3 Posts: 18,969
    I'll try a few bits in the ground. Not sure how they get on with clay, though.
    @Fairygirl
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 40,587
    All clay here @B3 :)
    Mine grows in the gravel paths too, but some of that is more free draining if it's right in at the edges and against walls or raised beds, so the soil doesn't seem to have much effect.
    I don't think those 'common' saxifrages are too bothered at all, although some others might be. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • B3B3 Posts: 18,969
    That's good. I'll definitely for some about then @Fairygirl
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 40,587
    Here's a bit of a pic from earlier this year

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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